Daunte Wright protester shows CNN his can of soup, mocking 2020 Trump comments

‘I’m just standing here today with soup for my family,’ the protester says, echoing an odd comment from Donald Trump last summer

Nathan Place
New York
Thursday 15 April 2021 16:35
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A protester in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota tells CNN he brought ‘soup for my family’

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Donald Trump’s strange prophecy of weaponised soup appeared to become a reality on Wednesday night, thanks to one of the people protesting over Daunte Wright’s death in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota.

“I’ve been here all four nights. I’m just standing here today with soup for my family,” the protester told CNN’s Sara Sidner, winking at the camera. “And we’re just watching all of this unfold. It’s very unfortunate.”

When Sidner asked if he planned to throw that can of soup at the police, the protester replied, “Like I said, it’s for my family.”

Back in July 2020, then-President Trump gave an oddly specific warning about the projectiles he said protesters were throwing at police.

“They have cans of soup. Soup. And they throw the cans of soup,” the president told the National Association of Police Organizations. “That’s better than a brick because you can’t throw a brick; it’s too heavy. But a can of soup, you can really put some power into that, right?”

“And then,” he went on, “when they get caught, they say, ‘No, this is soup for my family.’ They’re so innocent. ‘This is soup for my family.’ It’s incredible.”

The protester who spoke toCNN appeared to be mocking those comments.

At the time of Mr Trump’s remarks, protests were erupting across the United States over the death of George Floyd, who died after the Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin held his knee on his neck. Today Mr Chauvin is on trial for murder, but a new killing – also of a Black man, also by police, also in Minnesota – has sparked national outrage.

Daunte Wright, a 20-year-old father, was fatally shot by police officer Kim Potter during a traffic stop in Brooklyn Center. Ms Potter has since been arrested and charged with manslaughter, and has resigned from the Brooklyn Center Police Department. The chief of police, who also resigned, said Ms Potter meant to use her taser on Mr Wright, but shot him with her gun by mistake.

The shooting set off four nights of protests in Brooklyn Center and across the country. Though many of the protests have been peaceful, authorities have reported that some protesters have thrown objects at police.

“Unfortunately, again, some citizens decided to come out and throw these bricks and these other items at law enforcement,” Booker Hodges, an assistant commissioner for the Minnesota Department of Public Safety, said at a press conference on Wednesday. 

In front of him were several objects laid out on a table, including rocks, soda cans, and two cans of soup.

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