Trump's spokeswoman ridiculed for calling him 'the new Churchill' in tweet of magazine article

‘Those two words should not even be in the same sentence’

Trump compares himself to Winston Churchill...again
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Former President Donald Trump’s director of communications has been mocked online for comparing her boss to Winston Churchill.

Liz Harrington posted a link to an article from the American Spectator, an online magazine, with the headline “Trump: The New Churchill“ on Twitter.

Churchill is lauded on both sides of the Atlantic for his leadership during the Second World War and Mr Trump is among those to have expressed their admiration for him.

The article, by Jeffrey Lord, a conservative commentator and former Reagan official, compares the dynamic between Mr Trump and his successor President Joe Biden to that between Churchill and his predecessor Neville Chamberlain, the UK prime minister best known for his failed policy of appeasement towards Nazi Germany.

Ms Harrington and the article were mocked for the comparison between the Nobel prize-winning wartime leader and the twice-impeached one-term president.

“I think he meant to say, ‘Trump: The new Benedict Arnold’”, wrote Johnny Rocko.

Dan Fliller replied, “Those two words should not even be in the same sentence.”

Another person said, “Liz, I had no idea you were into comedy. Then again...”

“Not that I am a great admirer of Churchill but ....” said Naim Khan.

“Trump ain’t even worth tying the shoelaces of Winston,” wrote Calvin M Justin.

Another said, “I feel this is turning into a parody account. Hilarious.”

Previously, Mr Trump has expressed his love of the British wartime leader. Throughout his first bid for the White House, he implied he would put back the bust of Churchill in the Oval Office that President Barack Obama swapped for an artwork of Martin Luther King Jr.

During Theresa May’s visit to the White House shortly after Mr Trump’s inauguration in January 2017, the bust was featured in a number of photographs of the two leaders.

In 2020, Mr Trump told George Stephanopoulos he believed there were many similarities between himself and Churchill at an ABC News town hall.

Theresa May and Donald Trump meet beside a bust of former British Prime Minister Winston Churchill in the Oval Office of the White House on January 27, 2017

One comparison between the two that Mr Trump and his supporters may not enjoy is that Churchill was thrown out of power in a landslide election in 1945, being replaced by a left-wing leader – Clement Attlee – widely considered to have been one of Britain’s greatest ever prime ministers.

However, Mr Trump could turn that comparison to his advantage – just as Churchill returned to power for a second term in 1951, so the 45th president is thought to be planning a run for the White House again in 2024.

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