Florida professor fired for suggesting Texas deserved Harvey after voting for Trump

Harvey has brought unprecedented and catastrophic flooding to the southeastern region of Texas

Alexandra Wilts
Washington DC
Tuesday 29 August 2017 22:28
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Evacuees wade down a flooded section of Interstate 610 as floodwaters from Tropical Storm Harvey rise Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017, in Houston
Evacuees wade down a flooded section of Interstate 610 as floodwaters from Tropical Storm Harvey rise Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017, in Houston

The University of Tampa has fired a visiting professor for suggesting that Texas deserved Hurricane Harvey for supporting Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election.

Kenneth Storey, a sociology professor, was blasted on social media when we tweeted: “I dont believe in instant Karma but this kinda feels like it for Texas. Hopefully this will help them realize the GOP doesnt care about them.”

One commenter asked Mr Storey if Trump supporters in Florida deserved a similar fate.

“Yep, those who voted for him here deserve it as well,” Mr Storey replied.

He soon lost his job.

“We condemn the comments and the sentiment behind them, and understand the pain this irresponsible act has caused,” the university said in a statement. “As Floridians, we are well aware of the destruction and suffering associated with tropical weather. Our thoughts and prayers are with all impacted by Hurricane Harvey.”

In a statement to Fox News, university spokesman Eric Cardenas said Mr Storey was fired after the school faced an outpouring of online outrage over his comments. Other faculty in the sociology department will take over Mr Storey’s classes, the media outlet reported.

Mr Storey ultimately deleted his original tweet, according to Campus Reform, and wrote on Twitter: “I deeply regret a statement I posted yesterday. I never meant to wish ill will upon any group. I hope all affected by Harvey recover quickly.”

Harvey, which was downgraded from a hurricane to a tropical storm over the weekend, has brought unprecedented and catastrophic flooding to the southeastern region of Texas.

At least 14 have been reported dead in the Houston area, including six family members who were believed to have drowned when their van was swept away by floodwaters.

More than 3,500 people have been rescued, and about 30,000 are thought to have been displaced.

The storm could potentially dump more than 50 inches of rain on Houston, the amount the city usually gets over an entire year.

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