Biden: US boosting military presence in Europe for Russia threat

President Joe Biden says that the U.S. is enhancing its force posture in Europe for the long haul to bolster regional security after Russia’s invasion of Ukraine

President Joe Biden said Wednesday that the U.S. is enhancing its force posture in Europe for the long haul to bolster regional security after Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

Meeting with NATO secretary general Jens Stoltenberg in Madrid for the opening of the alliance’s annual leaders summit, Biden says “NATO is strong and united, and the steps we’re taking during this summit, we’re going to further augment our collective strength.”

Biden says the U.S. is establishing a permanent headquarters in Poland, sending two additional F-35 fighter jet squadrons to the UK and will send more “air defense and other capabilities” in Germany and Italy.

“Today I’m announcing the United States will enhance our force posture in Europe and respond to the changing security environment as well as strengthening our collective security,” Biden said, detailing the announcements.

“In Poland, we’re going establish a permanent headquarters, the US Fifth Army Corps, and strengthen the US-NATO interoperability across the entire eastern flank,” Biden said. He added that the U.S. is also stepping up its rotational deployments of troops to the Baltic region.

A day earlier, Biden announced that the U.S. would base two additional destroyers at its naval base in Rota, Spain.

The U.S. currently has more than 100,000 servicemembers deployed across Europe, up by about 20,000 since before Russian President Vladimir Putin's invasion of Ukraine began four months ago.

Biden predicted that the meetings this week would mark a “history-making summit,” as leaders are set to approve a new strategic framework, announce a range of steps to boost their defense spending and capabilities, and clear the way for historically neutral Finland and Sweden to join NATO.

“Putin was looking for the Finland-ization of Europe,” Biden said. “You’re gonna get the NATO-ization of Europe. And that’s exactly what he didn’t want, but exactly what needs to be done to guarantee security for Europe.”

Turkey, the last remaining holdout to approve the Nordic countries’ accession into NATO, reached an agreement on the eve of the summit late Tuesday to support adding them to the 30-nation alliance.

While the White House said the U.S. was not a direct party to the negotiations, a senior administration official said Biden spoke with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan on Tuesday to encourage him to clear the way for Sweden and Finland to join the alliance. The two leaders are set to hold a bilateral meeting Wednesday afternoon on a range of issues, the White House said.

At the summit, Biden will also sit down with South Korean President Yoon Seok-youl and Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida, who are attending the NATO summit as the alliance looks to strengthen its ties in the Indo-Pacific region and address challenges from China. The White House said the three-way meeting would also discuss North Korea’s nuclear and ballistic missile programs.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in