House 1/6 panel rejects Justice Dept.'s transcript request

The House panel investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol is rejecting a request from the Justice Department for access to the committee’s interviews, for now

Via AP news wire
Wednesday 18 May 2022 00:05
Biden
Biden

The House panel investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol is rejecting a request from the Justice Department for access to the committee’s interviews, for now.

Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., the committee’s chairman, said Tuesday that the Justice Department had made the request as part of its ongoing criminal investigation into the attack. But he said it was “premature” for the committee to share its work at this point because the panel’s probe is ongoing.

The Justice Department’s request comes as prosecutors have been issuing subpoenas and seeking interviews with people who had been involved in planning events leading up to the attack on the Capitol last year. The request to the House panel — which has conducted more than 1,000 interviews so far — exemplifies the breadth of the Justice investigation into one of the largest attacks on democracy in American history.

The Justice Department and Attorney General Merrick Garland have faced mounting pressure to prosecute former President Donald Trump since the Jan. 6 House committee laid out an argument for what its members believe could be a viable criminal case against the former president.

The Justice investigation — the largest criminal investigation in U.S. history — has largely focused on prosecuting those who stormed the Capitol, pushing past and beating overwhelmed police officers until they were bloodied and bruised, in an attempt to stop the certification of Joe Biden’s presidential win. In the 16 months since the insurrection, more than 800 people have been arrested and around 280 of them have pleaded guilty to a variety of federal charges.

Garland has given no public indication about whether prosecutors might be considering a case against Trump. He has vowed, though, to hold accountable “all January 6th perpetrators, at any level” and said that would include those who wete “present that day or were otherwise criminally responsible for the assault on our democracy.”

Thompson said the panel had shared some information with federal, state and local agencies but they could only review it in a specified location — a common government practice with sensitive documents known as an in-camera review. It’s unclear which specific interviews or documents the Justice Department had sought.

“They made a request, and we told them that as a committee, the product was ours, and we’re not giving anyone access to the work product,” Thompson told reporters Tuesday.

“We can’t share it, the document, with them,” Thompson said. “Big difference ... we can’t give them unilateral access.”

The Senate intelligence committee had rejected a similar request as part of its investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in