Trump compares himself to Boris Johnson and says Tory frontrunner will 'straighten out Brexit' in fresh attack on Theresa May

Comments come days before Britain gets new prime minister

Andrew Buncombe
Seattle
Friday 19 July 2019 14:17
Comments
Boris Johnson praises Trump, saying he has 'many, many good qualities'

Donald Trump has compared himself to Boris Johnson in a fresh attack on Theresa May, saying: “I think we’re going to have a great relationship.”

Speaking to reporters at the White House just days before the results of a vote by members of the British Conservative Party will determine the country’s next prime minister, Mr Trump said he had spoken to Mr Johnson a day earlier.

“I like Boris Johnson,” he said, claiming Ms May had done a “poor job” with Brexit. “I think Boris will straighten it out. A lot of people say Johnson is a different kind of guy.”

The president has never hidden his affection for the frontrunner. Earlier this year he said “he’s been very, very nice to me, very supportive”.

As he made his way to Britain for a state visit he told The Sun newspaper: “I think he is a great representative for your country. I am just saying I think he would be a great prime minister. I think he’s got what it takes.”

Mr Johnson has responded in kind. Speaking in June during a debate in Carlisle, as part of his shown down with Jeremy Hunt to become prime minister, Mr Johnson said the president had “many, many good qualities”.

He claimed Mr Trump had claimed kick start the US economy. “We should pay tribute to that,” he said.

Mr Trump has often criticised Ms May, in particular for the way she sough to secure Brexit, claiming she had ignored his advice which was to walk away from negotiations without a deal if required.

This month, after details of a classified cable were leaked revealing British diplomat Sir Kim Darroch had said the president oversaw a chaotic administration, Mr Trump attacked both the ambassador and the prime minister on Twitter.

Donald Trump claims he tried to stop 'send her back' chants by 'speaking very quickly'

“I have been very critical about the way the UK and prime minister Theresa May handled Brexit. What a mess she and her representatives have created. I told her how it should be done, but she decided to go another way,” he wrote.

“I do not know the ambassador, but he is not liked or well thought of within the US. We will no longer deal with him.”

He added: “The good news for the wonderful United Kingdom is that they will soon have a new prime minister. While I thoroughly enjoyed the magnificent state visit last month, it was the Queen who I was most impressed with.”

It was noticeable that while Ms May and Mr Hunt, the British foreign secretary, defended Mr Darroch, Mr Johnson, a former foreign secretary, refused to do so. Mr Darroch resigned the next day, saying his job had become untenable, and when Mr Johnson telephoned him to offer his regrets, the diplomat said he had resigned after learning of Mr Johnson’s repeated refusal to support him.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in