Trump suggests hosting next G7 summit at his financially struggling golf resort in Miami

President regularly promotes private properties while conducting political business

Donald Trump suggests holding next G7 at his financially struggling golf resort

Donald Trump said the next G7 summit may be held at his golf resort in Florida despite previous criticism that the president has stood to profit from hosting major political meetings at his private properties.

While meeting with the economic world powers in Biarritz, France on Monday, the president told reporters his Trump National Doral Miami Golf Resort was being considered as a likely venue when the US hosts the G7 in 2020.

“We haven’t made a final decision, but it’s right next to the airport, right there, meaning a few minutes away. It’s a great place, it’s got great acreage, many hundreds of acres, so we can handle whatever happens. It’s really ... people are liking it," Mr Trump said.

He added: “We’re thinking about it, they love the location of the hotel and they also like the fact that it’s right next to the airport for convenience. And it’s Miami ... Doral, Miami, so it’s a great area.”

Mr Trump said officials “haven’t found anything that’s even close to competing with it".

The statement reflected a trend on the part of the president to promote his private businesses since taking office in 2016.

In July he promoted an advert for his golf courses as Hurricane Barry barrelled towards Louisiana, and last year he hosted Japanese prime minister Shinzo Abe at the Trump International Golf Club.

Mr Trump made the comments about next year’s G7 summit while meeting with German chancellor Angela Merkel after beginning his day late. His meeting with Ms Merkel was delayed by two hours, according to the AP, and he missed a meeting he was scheduled to attend on climate change.

“The only thing I care about is this country,” Mr Trump said later Monday at a press conference while answering a reporter’s question about concerns he was profiting off the presidency.

“I’m not going to make any money, I don’t want to make any money,” he added, while describing the “luxurious” meeting rooms at his resort and its close proximity to the airport. “My people looked at 12 sites — all good, but some were two hours from the airport.”

If Mr Trump hosts next year’s summit at the Doral property, the resort could see a boost in revenue at a time when it has reportedly struggled to reach internal business targets.

“They are severely underperforming,” Jessica Vachiratevanurak, a tax consultant working to lower the resort’s tax bill, told an official for the county where the Doral is located, according to the Sun-Sentinel.

“There is some negative connotation that is associated with the brand,” she added.

The resort’s net operating income fell by 69 per cent since the year before Mr Trump took office, the paper reported in May.

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Several of the president’s private properties have reportedly struggled in recent years.

Mr Trump also owed 13 outstanding loans worth a minimum total of $310m (£253m), Mother Jones reported last year.

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