‘He had lovely parents, I don’t know what went wrong with him’: Trump’s distant Scottish cousin blasts president as selfish man who stole pancakes

‘I don’t like the man at all,’ says Alice Mackay, who remembers billionaire's mother fondly

Donald Trump waves to screaming protesters at Turnberry in Scotland

A distant cousin of Donald Trump has described him as a selfish man who stole pancakes and "wouldn’t give a penny" back to his mother’s native community in Scotland.

The US president last visited his late mother’s former home of Tong on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides for around three hours in 2008.

He spent just 97 seconds in the croft house where Mary Anne MacLeod Trump was raised alongside nine siblings before she emigrated to the US in 1930.

And Alice Mackay – who is related to Mr Trump’s maternal family line, the MacLeods – said the billionaire reality TV star was radically different to his mother and father.

“I don’t like the man at all,” said Ms Mackay, 79. “He had lovely parents, I don’t know what went wrong with him.”

Ms Mackay explained: “My mum and dad were second cousins. Every time they were over here they came to ours for dinner.

“He [Donald Trump] was here one morning I was busy making pancakes and he had forgotten my husband had died.

“He put a few pancakes in pocket and never said ‘cheerio’ or anything.”

Ms Mackay also claimed Mr Trump also failed to demonstrate the generosity of his mother and older sister, Maryanne Trump Barry, 82, who both maintained close links with the area and gave made significant donations to Lewis.

“They were a lovely pair,” she said. His sister gave a big donation to the hospice. Mary Anne gave money to the Tong centre as well. She was a lovely woman.

“They also asked Donald but he wouldn’t give a penny.”

Ms Mackay said that Mary Anne Trump came back to Tong every summer and stayed for a few months.

“She never forgot her roots and actually wanted to be buried here but I think it was too much of an expense at the time and I don’t think her husband wanted it,” she added.

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Mr Trump made his fleeting trip to Lewis 11 years ago while en route to give evidence at a public inquiry into his contentious inaugural Scottish golf resort.

A delegation from Comhairle nan Eilean Siar, the Western Isles council, met with him to discuss their plans to convert Lews Castle, a mock baronial mansion, into a hotel and museum.

Mr Trump promised to “look at it”, but the council never heard from him again.

SWNS

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