Bidens to host granddaughter Naomi’s wedding reception at White House

Reception planned for 19 November, less than two weeks after midterm elections

<p>Peter Neal and Naomi Biden attend the Ralph Lauren Fall 2022 Fashion Show at Museum of Modern Art on 22 March 2022 </p>

Peter Neal and Naomi Biden attend the Ralph Lauren Fall 2022 Fashion Show at Museum of Modern Art on 22 March 2022

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President Joe Biden and first lady Jill Biden will host their granddaughter’s wedding reception at the White House in November.

Naomi Biden, 28, got engaged to Peter Neal, 24, in September 2021 near his family home in Jackson Hole, Wyoming.

She is the eldest of the Biden grandchildren and is the daughter of Hunter Biden and Kathleen Buhle.

The White House reception is scheduled for 19 November, less than two weeks after the midterm elections. It is not known where the wedding ceremony will take place.

The first lady’s communications director Elizabeth Alexander told CNN: “The first family, the couple, and their parents are still in the planning stages of all of the wedding festivities and look forward to announcing further details in the coming months.”

Ms Biden tweeted: “Peter and I are endlessly grateful to my Nana and Pop for the opportunity to celebrate our wedding at the White House. We can’t wait to make our commitment to one another official and for what lies ahead.”

She is a Washington-based lawyer and he is in his final year of law school at the University of Pennsylvania. They have been together for approximately four years after meeting on a date in New York City arranged by a mutual friend.

The engagement ring includes the band from his grandmother’s engagement ring.

Recent White House weddings include Jenna Bush, daughter of President George W Bush, who was married at the family ranch in Crawford, Texas, but enjoyed a reception for 600 people at the executive mansion in May 2008.

Prior to that, Tricia Nixon walked down the aisle in the Rose Garden to marry Edward Cox in 1971 during her father’s first term.

Both of Lyndon Johnson’s daughters also celebrated their weddings at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue  — Lynda Bird Johnson was married in the East Room in 1967 and her sister Luci held a reception at the White House after a ceremony at a nearby church.

There is a long history of White House nuptials dating back to the 1800s including the children of presidents Monroe, Adams, Tyler, and Grant, as well as both daughters and a niece of President Woodrow Wilson in the early 20th century.

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