Father killed after student who jumped to his death lands on him

Yang Dae-jin sustained severe injuries to his head and later died while the student was killed instantly

Samuel Osborne
Saturday 04 June 2016 15:40
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General view of the Gwangju district court, in the South Korean city of Gwangju
General view of the Gwangju district court, in the South Korean city of Gwangju

A South Korean civil servant has been killed after he was hit by a student who had jumped to his death.

Yang Dae-jin, 39, was killed when the 25-year-old student jumped from the 20th floor of an apartment building on Tuesday, the Korea Times reports.

Mr Dae-jin sustained severe injuries to his head and later died in hospital. The student was killed instantly.

The civil servant was on his way home with his pregnant wife and five-year-old son in Gwangju, South Korea. He had been working in the public relations department in the adjacent county of Gokseong.

The student was reportedly preparing to take the civil service exam.

"We are considering charging the student with accidental homicide," a police officer told the Korea Times.

"The case will be concluded without indictment as the student is dead, but this procedure is expected to help Yang's family receive compensation."

Mr Dae-jin's family have forgiven the student and have decided not to seek compensation, the Korea Joonang Daily reported.

Speaking at his funeral, his widow's 53-year-old uncle, surnamed Seo, reportedly said: “The college student who committed suicide is another victim of our mercilessly competitive society.

“So we have decided to forgive him.”

Officer stops suicide attempt

When asked further about the student, Mr Seo added: “I heard he was preparing for the civil servant examination.

"The family must be also going through a hard time from the loss of their beloved one. I can’t imagine how it would feel like to lose my son so suddenly.

"Yang’s wife went through a lot, but she finally decided to forgive the student.”

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