Japan weather forecast: Super Typhoon Hagibis to smash into Japan, forcing cancellation of Rugby World Cup matches

England vs France and New Zealand vs Italy games will not be played as storm bears down on central areas of country

Super Typhoon Hagibis- Japan's Rugby World Cup and F1 under threat

Two Rugby World Cup matches have been cancelled in Japan as the country prepares to be hit by a super typhoon with the potential to cause widespread damage from torrential rains and high winds.

Typhoon Hagibis – which means “speed” in Filipino – had sustained speeds of 270kmh (168mph) early on Thursday along with stronger gusts – making it the equivalent of a Category 5 hurricane.

Speeds are expected to fall before it makes landfall in the Tokyo region over the weekend.

Large areas of Japan’s central Pacific coast may see torrential rains beginning on Friday and worsening on Saturday while high waves and tides may cause flooding, according to forecasts.

The Japan Meteorological Agency urged people to take precautions to avoid potentially life-threatening danger.

Rugby World Cup organisers have already cancelled two games which were to be played on Saturday as a result – England vs France in Yokohama, and New Zealand vs Italy in Toyoda.

Cancelled matches will be recorded as a scoreless draw, with each team receiving two points. As a result, England will top their group.

England head coach Eddie Jones said the team was disappointed, but the decision not to play was the right one.

A marathon going through in Sendai and other northern coastal towns has also been cancelled, and Formula One racing in Suzuka in central Japan may also be affected.

Airlines and train services anticipate cancellations affecting holidaymakers travelling over the three-day weekend that includes Sports Day holiday on Monday.

The approaching typhoon is spreading fear especially in Chiba, near Tokyo, which was hit by Typhoon Faxai last month, and where many residents are still recovering from damage to their homes.

The typhoon tore many electrical poles and snapped cables, triggering extensive outages that lasted for weeks, contributing to heat illnesses and other health problems among elderly people.

The East Japan Railway Co said it may suspend services on most local lines and bullet trains around Tokyo before the typhoon arrives.

Japan Airlines and All Nippon Airways said they may ground flights as early as Friday, depending on the typhoon’s movement.

Japan is regularly hit by Pacific storms, including Faxai in September. Typhoon Jebi flooded a terminal and a runway at Kansai International Airport last year.

Additional reporting by AP

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in