North Korea looks to the future ahead of once-in-a-generation party congress as the South fears terror attacks

Slogans issued by the Central Committee and the Central Military Commission of the ruling Workers’ Party of Korea, reflect what the party sees as the nation’s priorities in the months and years that lie ahead

Eric Talmadge
Pyongyang
Thursday 18 February 2016 22:20
Comments
News of North Korea’s bomb test shown in Tokyo
News of North Korea’s bomb test shown in Tokyo

The exhortations are direct, if not always clear, and exclamation marks abound. “Send more satellites into space!” “Produce more new-generation electric locomotives and passenger cars!” and “Make the whole country seethe with a high-pitched campaign for producing greenhouse vegetables!”

These are just a selection of the new slogans released by North Korea's ruling party to guide and inspire the nation ahead of a once-in-a-generation party congress scheduled for May. Coming at a time when the regime is being threatened with new sanctions and further isolation for conducting a recent nuclear test and rocket launch, the slogans, issued by the Central Committee and the Central Military Commission of the ruling Workers’ Party of Korea, reflect what the party sees as the nation’s priorities in the months and years that lie ahead.

The topics range from boosting the economy to becoming an international sports power and, of course, building more edifices in honour of the nation’s leaders and toeing the party line.

The nuclear bomb test the North claimed it conducted last month was mentioned once, but it was a mouthful: “Let’s dynamically wage this year’s general advance in the same spirit as shown in succeeding in the H-bomb test!” South Korea is one of a number of nations, including the US, that has called for more stringent sanctions on the North in the wake of that test and the rocket launch earlier this month – and officials have talked up the threat from across the border.

In televised remarks, senior South Korean presidential official Kim Sung-woo said North Korean leader Kim Jong-un recently ordered preparations for launching “terror” attacks on South Koreans. He added that the North’s spy agency has begun work to implement Kim Jong-un’s order to “muster anti-South terror capabilities that can pose a direct threat to our lives and security.”

Mr Kim also called for the quick passage of an anti-terror bill through parliament. The security bill proposes to establish a new anti-espionage unit that would report to the spy agency chief and will co-ordinate surveillance, analysis and investigation into leads that point to a possible attack.

The proposed law would also empower South Korea’s intelligence agency authority to monitor private communications. The bill has met with resistance from the country’s liberal opposition parties, which, say the spy agency, is not politically impartial.

AP

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in