North Korea state media attacks ‘double-faced’ South over UN human rights resolution

‘In front of us South Korea talks of trust and harmony, while it follows the foreign forces’ ploy behind our back’

Saman Javed
Sunday 23 December 2018 17:02
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The UN also called on the Security council to consider individual sanctions to “target effectively those who appear to be the most responsible for human rights violations”.
The UN also called on the Security council to consider individual sanctions to “target effectively those who appear to be the most responsible for human rights violations”.

North Korean media has launched an attack on South Korea for what it described as its neighbour’s “double-faced” participation in a United Nations resolution condemning the country’s violations of human rights.

The UN passed a resolution this week at the General Assembly which criticised the “longstanding and ongoing systematic, widespread and gross violations of human rights” by the North Korean government, according to Yonhap News Agency.

The General Assembly cited abuses which could “amount to crimes against humanity” including torture, rape, public executions and the use of the death penalty for political and religious reasons.

It marked the 14th consecutive year the UN has passed such a document.

A North Korean propaganda outlet, Uriminzokkiri, described South Korea’s participation as “double-faced”.

The website said: “The South Korean authorities expressed support for the US’s anti-Pyongyang ploy to condemn the human rights situation.”

“In front [of us], they [South Korea] talks of trust and harmony, while it follows the foreign forces’ ploy behind our back.”

Another propaganda website, Maeari, criticised the countries that participated in the resolution and warned “followers ... Will pay dearly for their provocative and malign acts”, according to First Post.

In its resolution, the UN further condemned the “continuing impunity” for human rights violations and encouraged the UN Security Council to “take appropriate action to ensure accountability”, such as by referral of the situation to the International Criminal Court.

The organisation also called on the council to consider individual sanctions to “target effectively those who appear to be the most responsible for human rights violations”.

North Korea’s UN ambassador, Kim Song, denied the allegations, calling them “most despicable false words”, fabricated by a “handful of defectors who escaped the country after having committed crimes”.

South Korea’s foreign ministry has defended its decision to support the resolution, citing a need for “substantive improvement” in the human rights of North Korean citizens.

It added that it hoped these efforts would lead to the establishment of “long-lasting peace and stability” in the Korean peninsula.

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