World's highest glass-bottomed bridge in China closes two weeks after opening

Organisers said they were closing the bridge for maintenance due to an 'overwhelming number of visitors'

Alexandra Sims
Sunday 04 September 2016 12:49
Comments
World's highest glass-bottomed bridge opens in China

The world's highest and longest glass-bottomed bridge in China has been forced to close for maintenance less than two weeks after opening to the public.

The six-metre-wide bridge is 430m long and spans a valley connecting two mountains in Zhangjiajie, Hunan Province.

Designed by Israeli architect Haim Dotan, the see-through floor allows visitors to peer 300m below onto the valley's lush mountains, caves and waterfalls.

Visitors cross the world's highest and longest glass-bottomed bridge

Progress of the building of the £2.6 million structure was followed closely by Chinese media and it was opened on 20 August.

But just 13 days after opening, organisers announced they were closing the structure after an overwhelming number of visitors meant the bridge required urgent maintenance work.

"We're overwhelmed by the volume of visitors," a spokesman from the Zhangjiajie Grand Canyon’s marketing and sales department told CNN.

He said the bridge could hold 8,000 people a day but demand had been 10 times greater.

The bridge's management announced the closure on Thursday on its official Weibo account - a Chinese blogging site.

A tourist poses for a photograph on the world's highest and longest glass-bottomed bridge
A girl looks through the glass on the world's highest and longest glass-bottomed bridge

It said that due to the "urgency to improve and update" the attraction, the government decided to suspend operations on 2 September.

No details were given as the when the bridge will reopen and it apologised for any inconvenience.

During the closure, the Zhangjiajie Grand Canyon is also planning to improve the attraction's infrastructure, including the car park, ticketing system and customer service.

The closure has been heavily criticized, with many people taking to social media to voice their frustration at the change to their travel plans.

A tourist takes a photograph on the world's highest and longest glass-bottomed bridge

“I’m on the train right now. I can’t change my travel plans or get a refund… You are the world’s number one cheat," one social media user said, the Guardian reports.

“You… have cheated customers,” said another.

China has a number of glass-bottomed bridges and walkways.

The managers of the Zhangjiajie Grand Canyon bridge were clear to emphasise its safety after a glass-bottomed walkway attached to the side of a mountain in Yuntai Mountain, Henan Province cracked while terrified tourists were traversing it in October last year.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in