Strange creature found in Sydney goes viral: ‘With Covid and WWIII, could very well be an alien’

Even biologists were reportedly not able to identify the ‘thing’

Maroosha Muzaffar
Thursday 03 March 2022 12:17
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<p>A strange-looking creature was found in the streets of Sydney on Monday and the internet has since been trying to identify the ‘alien’</p>

A strange-looking creature was found in the streets of Sydney on Monday and the internet has since been trying to identify the ‘alien’

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A bizarre-looking creature resembling an embryo was found on a street in Sydney on Wednesday and since then bemused social media users have been trying to figure out what it is.

One man named Harry Hayes posted on his Instagram a short video of a slimy creature with tiny eyes on Wednesday. While jogging on Monday morning, Mr Hayes stumbled upon it and when he posted the video online, no one, not even academicians and experts, could tell what it was.

Mr Hayes wrote on his Instagram: “Found this on the road, wtf is it?”

Users were equally at the loss of words. One wrote: “Wait do we know what it is?”

“Was it alive,” commented one.

Another just said: “Wtf.”

Sydney has been lashed with massive rains over the last few days and several areas have also been flooded. Emergency services and rescue teams have been working day in and day out trying to save people affected in the flooded zones.

But Mr Hayes said that he didn’t find the bizarre creature in any flooded area. But instead in a damp street in the Marrickville suburb of Sydney.

He said: “My gut says it’s some kind of embryo but with Covid, World War III, and the floods [going on right now] this could very well be an alien.”

The video he shared on his Instagram was soon shared on Twitter and other social media platforms. In the video, Mr Hayes is seen poking the creature with a tiny stick, trying to elicit a response from it.

The photo of the “alien” was then shared by an Australian influencer Lil Ahenkan who wrote: "What is this?"

Users came up with several theories. "Shark embryo maybe? Or some other sea creature," one person said.

"That’s an alien," said another.

The strange creature has bamboozled even biologists.

Biologist Ellie Elissa who shared the photo too was also stunned. “What in the what IS this thing? I thought possum/glider embryo but I have no context or scale and none of my peers can agree.”

And predictably enough, politicians became the butt of the jokes. One user wrote: “Baby picture of Peter Dutton [an Australian politician].”

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