Coronavirus: Sinn Fein president Mary Lou McDonald reveals she was ‘very unwell’ with Covid-19

‘The public health doctor informs me that I am no longer infected or infectious, and this is a great relief after weeks of being very unwell’

Lizzy Buchan
Political Correspondent
Tuesday 14 April 2020 17:55
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Coronavirus in numbers

Sinn Fein president Mary Lou McDonald has revealed she has been “very unwell” after battling coronavirus and developing an inflammation in her lung.

Ms McDonald spoke of her “great relief” at being well enough to return to work on Monday after testing positive for Covid-19 and spending several weeks fighting the virus.

In a statement, Ms McDonald said she had waited two weeks for a result after being tested for coronavirus but she had been informed by doctors on Monday that she was no longer infected with the virus.

She said: ”The public health doctor informs me that I am no longer infected or infectious, and this is a great relief after weeks of being very unwell.

“I had a setback in my recovery at the weekend and developed post-viral pleurisy in my right lung.

“I am on medication and responding very well, and I fully expect to be back at work next Monday.

“My thoughts and solidarity are with everyone who is sick at this time, and my gratitude is with our doctors, nurses, carers and everyone who looks after us.”

Ms McDonald said she was “heartbroken” for bereaved families and urged everyone to stay at home, adding: “You do not want to get this virus.”

She said: “Thanks to everyone who has asked after me and sent good wishes. Your kindness is much appreciated and I’ll be back next week.

“There is much work to be done – Ireland must change for the better.”

It comes after Ireland’s rival parties Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael hammered out a draft agreement to form a new government, which is expected to be considered by party leaders in the coming days.

No single party won enough seats to govern in January’s election, leaving Fine Gael’s Leo Varadkar to lead a caretaker government during the coronavirus epidemic.

Both of the centre-right parties have been resistant to forming a government with Sinn Fein, which won the largest share of first preference votes in the election.

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