Emmanuel Macron announces government re-shuffle after landslide victory in parliamentary election

French president's new team includes 15 men and 15 women and 14 ministers from civil society

Chloe Farand
Thursday 22 June 2017 12:01
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French President Emmanuel Macron (centre), Prime Minister Edouard Philippe (left) and Interior Minister Gerard Collomb at the Elysee Palace in Paris
French President Emmanuel Macron (centre), Prime Minister Edouard Philippe (left) and Interior Minister Gerard Collomb at the Elysee Palace in Paris

French President Emmanuel Macron has completed a government re-shuffle following his landslide victory in the country's parliamentary election.

His new team includes 15 men and 15 women and 14 ministers from civil society. It keeps a fragile balance of those from left, right and centre, breaking with convention to extend his support base.

The reshuffle, which includes more people from the non-political world, reflects the profile of many of his newly elected members of parliament. A ;large number of them have never held a public office before.

The move was expected after Mr Macron’s movement En Marche!, which he founded just a year ago, won an outright majority in France’s parliament, shaking up the country's political landscape.

However, the mood of victory soured when four ministers, appointed less than a month ago, were forced to resign over allegations of misuse of funds and financial misconduct.

Mr Macron, who swept an overwhelming majority in the presidential election against far-right Front National candidate Marine Le Pen last month, had promised to quash corruption scandals if elected.

Among the positions filled by women are Minister of Justice, Minister of the Army and Minister of European Affairs.

Remaining in key positions are left-wing mayor of Lyon since, Gerard Collomb, who will serve as Minister of the Interior, Nicolas Hulot as Environment Minister, conservative Bruno Le Maire as Minister of the Economy and Socialist Jean-Yves Le Drian as minister of Europe and foreign affairs.

Businesswoman Florence Parly, who worked previously in a Socialist government and for major French transport companies, was named defence minister, and law expert Nicole Belloubet was nominated for justice minister.

Jacques Mezard moved from the Agriculture Ministry to the Territorial Planning Ministry after Mr Macron's right-hand man Richard Ferrand quit the government earlier this week following allegations of financial misconduct.

A Macron ally since endorsing his centrist bid for the presidency in February, Mr Bayrou said he quit to protect the government from the scandal that has engulfed him.

"I will stand by the president and faithfully support him with a political and personal understanding that is dear to me," he told journalists.

Speaking on French radio Europe 1, a government spokesman said the recent resignations “simplified things”.

"We have a majority after Sunday's big win and we have the wherewithal to govern. So now it's time to get to work."

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