Images emerge of 'gay' man 'thrown from building by Isis militants before he is stoned to death after surviving fall'

Warning: Some readers may find the images below disturbing. Monitoring group says man was killed in Syrian town of Raqqa

Images have emerged which appear to show a man charged with having a homosexual affair being thrown off a building by Isis militants in Raqqa, Syria
Images have emerged which appear to show a man charged with having a homosexual affair being thrown off a building by Isis militants in Raqqa, Syria

Disturbing images have emerged which appear to show a man charged with having a homosexual affair being stoned to death after he survived being thrown off a building by Isis militants.

The London-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, which obtains its information from a network of activists on the ground, has quoted a source saying the man was killed in the Syrian city of Raqqa late last month.

Photographs of the incident have now been published online by Isis militants, the group has said.

Another image appears to show the man falling from the building. An aerial photograph then shows a crowd forming a circle around him on the floor as rocks are thrown at him.

The man is apparently stoned to death after he survives the fall

A 'judgement' was apparently read out by militants before the man was thrown from the building as punishment for his sexuality, The Mirror has reported.

The man's reported death follows a number of public executions last month, including two men accused of homosexual acts who were also reportedly thrown off a building.

A series of photographs were released attributed to the "Information Office of the mandate of Nineveh", a city in Iraq.

The images claimed to show Isis militants carrying out "hudud", the system of fixed punishments for what the group's courts regard as serious crimes.

The pictures appear to show the men at the top of a large tower overlooking the city. One image showed a man falling towards the ground, while later images show both men's bodies at the base of the towers.

In December, Isis released a copy of its penal code, which listed so-called "crimes" punishable by amputation, stoning and crucifixion.

Some of the crimes included homosexuality and "spying for the unbelievers", both of which were deemed punishable by death.

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