In pictures: The fire and the fury of Lebanon’s nationwide protests

Protesters in Lebanon want to overhaul the political system that has been in place since the end of the civil war

In just two weeks, protests in Lebanon have transformed the country.

What began as a spontaneous fit of anger over new taxes spiralled into the largest protest movement in more than a decade.

For the first time, the sectarian political order that has governed this eastern Mediterranean nation since the end of the civil war in 1990 is facing mass demonstrations aimed at its overthrow.

Tired of widespread corruption, a failing economy and a sectarian political system that perpetuates both of those things, protesters brought the country to a halt with roadblocks and mass rallies.

This week, Lebanon’s prime minister Saad Hariri resigned from his post in an effort to break the deadlock.

But it may not be enough to quell a movement that wants radical change.

 

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