Yemen: Rare 360 footage reveals devastating impact of war on civilians

December 19 marks 1,000 days since the conflict began

Harry Cockburn
Tuesday 19 December 2017 18:39
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Devastation on the ground in Yemen displayed by International Rescue Committee in shocking video

Yemen has now been embroiled in its bloody civil war since March 2015, and 19 December marks the 1000th day of the conflict.

Over 5,000 civilians, more than 20 per cent of them children, are estimated to have been killed in the fighting, while almost 50,000 people are believed to have been injured.

The country is one of the Arab world’s poorest, and the impact of the war has destroyed infrastructure and hit food, medicine and fuel supplies, creating what the UN has described as a “catastrophic” humanitarian situation.

The terrible conditions have left the country in the grip of the largest cholera outbreak in modern history, which has caused over 2,000 deaths and now affects an estimated million people.

The International Rescue Committee has produced an interactive 360-degree video showing the impact of the conflict on civilians.

The video shows people surviving in buildings where they say they are routinely under fire and living without food or basic amenities such as running water or electricity.

The IRC is calling for an immediate ceasefire, the renewal of an actionable peace process and to ensure adequate and safe access for primary humanitarian interventions.

Medical services have frequently been targeted in the war, and remaining facilities have been stretched beyond their limits.

“Unless the blockade is completely lifted, then conditions in Yemen will continue to deteriorate and innocent civilians will pay the price,” the organisation said.

The civil war erupted following President Abdrabbuh Mansour Hadi’s transition to power.

Many people were disillusioned by his administration’s weakness, prompting the formation of the Houthi rebel movement.

The Houthis took control of the northern part of the country and the capital Sanaa, forcing Mr Hadi to flee in March 2015.

Saudi Arabia, and eight other Arab states, with logistical support from the UK, France and the US launched an air campaign aiming to restore Mr Hadi’s government.

Since then UN efforts to negotiate a peace deal have failed and bitter fighting has continued.

This week the Saudi-led coalition fighting the rebels said it intercepted a missile fired over Saudi Arabia’s capital Riyadh. The Yemeni rebels said they had targeted the royal palace in the kingdom's capital.

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