'Me too': Millions of women share sexual assault stories as new 'Him though' hashtag urges men to take responsibility

'How many women will it take to say #MeToo before men talk about #HimThough?'

Lucy Pasha-Robinson
Tuesday 17 October 2017 13:47
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Harvey Weinstein at the 2017 Oscars ceremony in Febuary; the Academy announced on Saturday he would be expelled after more than 20 years in the organisation
Harvey Weinstein at the 2017 Oscars ceremony in Febuary; the Academy announced on Saturday he would be expelled after more than 20 years in the organisation

More than 12 million people across the world have shared their experiences of sexual abuse and harassment after the hashtag "Me too" exploded on social media.

The phrase began trending on Twitter after people were asked to share their experiences in light of the sexual assault allegations against Harvey Weinstein.

Thousands posted in reply to actress Alyssa Milano after she shared a screenshot of the suggestion on social media.

"We might give people a sense of the magnitude of the problem," she said.

After 24 hours, more than 500,000 tweets and 12 million Facebook posts had been shared with the phrase.

But now, a new hashtag is being circulated to encourage men to take responsibility.

"How many women will it take to say #metoo before men talk about #himthough?" Liz Plank, who started the hashtag, wrote on Twitter.

"Why is the burden always on women? I'm done pretending sexual assault is a woman's issue. Your shame is not ours. No sir. #HimThough"

Ms Plank's campaign has since gone viral, with hundreds of social media users sharing their own #himthough stories.

"We have, as #Men, a responsibility in calling out the bullshit we create as men, reagardless of our sexual orientation. #HimThough," user @2Fikornot2fik wrote.

Another, Dominique Fraser, said: "Now that we've highlighted the ubiquity of #metoo, let's change the language and focus to #himtoo #himthough."

The #himthough hashtag was not the only campaign to reject #metoo.

Other women took to social media to remind users sexual assault survivors should not be forced to share their stories.

"Reminder that if a woman didn't post #MeToo, it doesn't mean she wasn't sexually assaulted or harassed. Survivors don't owe you their story," wrote user Alexis Benveniste.

Claims against Weinstein have snowballed since a New York Times investigation revealed he had reached out-of-court settlements with eight women earlier this month.

Asia Argento, Lucia Evans, Lysette Anthony and Rose McGowan are among the actresses who have said they were raped by the disgraced Hollywood mogul.

High-profile Hollywood actresses including Angelina Jolie, Kate Beckinsale and Gwyneth Paltrow have said Weinstein harassed them.

Weinstein has "unequivocally denied" allegations of non-consensual sex and has not been charged with a crime.

He remains under investigation on both sides of the Atlantic.

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