The most popular official photograph from the royal wedding only took three minutes to capture, says Alexi Lubomirski

‘It was just this beautiful moment’

Royal Wedding photographer reveals how he shot the black and white Rose Garden photo

The royal wedding was a well-oiled machine, with every stage of the occasion taking place like clockwork throughout the day.

Amidst all the pomp and circumstance of the proceedings, official wedding photographer Alexi Lubomirski was able to capture an intimate photograph of the newlywed Duke and Duchess of Sussex smiling as they sat together on some steps at their wedding reception.

While many may assume that it took a lot of time and diligent preparation to arrange such a charming image, Lubomirski has revealed that he actually only had around three minutes to capture the candid shot.

Lubomirski, who previously photographed Prince Harry and Meghan for their engagement photoshoot, had taken the couple into the rose garden during the reception following the royal wedding family portraits.

As they began to make their way back into the function, the photographer requested that they quickly stay for a few more pictures.

“I said, ‘Listen, just before you go in let’s sit down on these stairs,’ and she just slumped in between his legs,” he told the BBC.

“There was this moment where they were just laughing because they were joking about how they were exhausted and finally it’s all over and they just looked at each other and they were just laughing.

“It was just this beautiful moment.”

Lubomirski stated that everything just fell into place, describing the moment as “magical”.

The photograph in question, which shows Meghan leaning on Prince Harry and smiling to her left as he grins into the camera, has garnered more than two million likes on Instagram.

In comparison, the picture depicting their first kiss as a married couple has more than 995,000 likes.

The most popular picture from their engagement shoot, which Lubomirski shot at Frogmore House in December, has more than 821,000 likes.

When it came to the official family portraits of Prince Harry and Meghan with the wedding party, Lubomirski was keen to ensure that the pictures appeared natural.

“I wanted it to feel like a family picture, I didn’t want it to feel too much like a sports team photo or an army photo, or very regimented and linear,” he explained.

He strove to incorporate some “rhythm” into the photographs, organising the room in an asymmetric manner and having Princess Charlotte sit on her mother’s lap.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in