Amir Khan says he’s ‘peeing blood’ after low blow as he hits back over claims he quit against Terence Crawford

The British boxer was stopped in the sixth round after a controversial low blow that he insists hit him ‘in the balls’ and not the leg, but Crawford reacted angrily and accused Khan of quitting

Jack de Menezes
Sunday 21 April 2019 11:07
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Amir Khan v Terence Crawford: Amir Khan protests accusations he quit

Amir Khan has attempted to clarify the confusing circumstances surrounding his TKO defeat against Terence Crawford by claiming he wanted to continue fighting, and that the reason why the WBO welterweight title was waved off was due to a miscommunication with his trainer Virgil Hunter.

Khan recovered from a first-round knockdown to take unbeaten Crawford to the sixth round, but a low blow from the American led to a controversial finish as Khan winced back to his corner. Allowed five minutes to recover, Khan appeared to inform his trainer Hunter that he was not able to continue due to the pain, with the fight waved off barely a minute later.

It resulted in Crawford being declared the winner as it was not an obvious deliberate low blow – which would have resulted in disqualification – and a cacophony of boos from the crowd for Khan.

But the Bolton-born 32-year-old has posted a message on Twitter to claim that he thought Hunter was asking if the punch still hurt, with his reply appearing to prove the catalyst to the fight being stopped.

“I have never quit a fight in my life,” Khan wrote on Twitter. “My understanding was that Virgil asked me if the low blow still hurt and I said yes. My intention was to wait it out and continue like always.”

He later tweeted an image of the punch and added: “Peeing blood. The shot was low. The fight was just getting interesting. Well done team Terrance (sic). I never quit, I rather get knocked out cold then quit. Good night. Thank you New York.”

The finish brought Khan’s fifth defeat of his career and leaves him at a crossroads where retirement is a very realistic option. But he denied claims that Crawford’s punch actually hit him in the leg and reiterated that he “does not quit” and “didn’t quit” the fight.

"I could feel it in my stomach,” Khan said. "I recovered from shots in that fight but I just never recovered from that last shot. I don't want to take anything away from Crawford, he put on a great fight; it was a pleasure to be in the ring with him.

Crawford caught Khan with a low blow in the sixth round (Reuters)

"I would never quit - I'd rather get knocked out. I've been knocked out because I've tried. The leg? It was the balls.

"I've never quit from a fight. A great fighter beat me. I don't quit.

"I've had a few little problems in camp (with my right arm) but it was fine; the adrenaline kept it going. I was okay to continue.

"If I quit I would not be sat here in front of you - I wanted to face you and to face Terence as well.”

Khan went on to play down thoughts of retirement, which could yet lead to the sought-after domestic bought against long-term rival Kell Brook.

"I wanted to fight the best out there and win as many titles as I can,” Khan added. “I'll spend time with my family and see where I go from there. I lost to a very good fighter - he's very skilful. I'm 32. I've still got a lot left in me and I still love the sport."

Khan was given up to five minutes to recover but pulled out after one (Reuters)

However, Crawford – who notched his 35th career victory in defeating Khan – interrupted the Briton at one point to demand that he “tell the truth” and labelled him a quitter.

"You didn't quit? Tell the truth. I'm asking you what happened,” Crawford said. "It was low, it was low; it probably was low.

"I saw Amir's face and he was shaking his head. I was getting disappointed because I knew he was looking for a way out. I thought 'Oh, man, he's about to quit', and I was right.

Khan claims he did not quit and wanted to fight on (Getty)

"That's not the way I wanted to finish the fight but Virgil's in his corner for a reason, he has to look out for his fighter; he thought his fighter didn't want to fight anymore so he stopped it.

"I was touching him more, picking up the intensity, and he was looking for a way out."

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