Deontay Wilder vs Tyson Fury: Bronze Bomber scaring even himself as he steps up preparations

The pair meet in Los Angeles on December 1 with Wilder aware that it could well prove the toughest test of his career to date

Declan Taylor
Sunday 30 September 2018 13:50
Comments
Tyson Fury sees off Pianeta and confirms next fight with Deontay Wilder

After violently dispatching all 39 men he has ever shared a professional ring with, Deontay Wilder admits the devastating power with which he punches is starting to scare even him.

And that is why the WBC champion believes Tyson Fury will be fearful by the time they finally step through the ropes at the Staples Center, Los Angeles on December 1.

All but one of Wilder's 40 victories have come inside the distance and Bermane Stiverne, the only opponent to make it through 12 rounds, was ruthlessly taken out in the first round of their 2017 rematch.

But Wilder's next assignment could be the toughest of the lot with undefeated Fury considered one of the most awkward and hard-to-hit heavyweight movers on the planet. The pair come nose-to-nose today at Stratford's Olympic Park as they kick off the three-city press tour to publicise their intriguing winter tussle.

Fury is two fights and two wins into his comeback after ending a ring hiatus which lasted nearly 1,000 days. The jury, however, is still out on whether or not he can rekindle the form which enabled him to dethrone Wladimir Klitschko in November 2015 to clinch the WBA, WBO and IBF titles.

He will face the ultimate acid test in the form of Wilder, who has courted controversy for some sickening comments made about a desire for 'a body' on his record.

The 32-year-old from Tuscaloosa, Alabama, qualified the quote by insisting that is only what his alter-ego the 'Bronze Bomber' wants, but not Deontay Wilder. It was a defence which would not stand up in court.

But, although he no longer talks about wishing to kill people, Wilder says his power is a concern carried not only by his opponents.

“I'm the most dangerous man in the division,” he said. “So when these guys face me there is an element of fear.

“Even I feel the effect of the fear because I know what I possess. I know what my mindset is when I transform into the Bronze Bomber. It is nothing pleasant, trust me. It is nothing nice.

Fury and Wilder face off in December

“I don't mean no good for the opponent when I'm getting in that ring. It's a crazy feeling how I feel when I look a man in the eyes and tell him what is real.

“Because I mean what I say and I say what I mean. I think people are starting to understand me. This is boxing and anything goes in boxing.”

Some of the early rounds of Wilder's latest fight, against Luis Ortiz in March, drew boos from the crowd inside the Barclays Center before they were thrilled by the champion's 10th-round finish.

And it is not out of the question that Fury will look to spoil Wilder's gameplan in a bid to nullify his power for 12 rounds.

But Wilder has a very clear picture of how the 'madness and awkwardness' will eventually end in his favour.

Fury is two from two on his comeback 

He said: “Fury is difficult to catch up with but I'm awkward too.

“Somewhere between this madness and awkwardness, there is going to be some angling, some position making, readjusting and there is going to be a point of time when me or him get the exact angles, exact position to the point where I see you and goodnight. You feel me? It only takes one second.

“He has to be perfect for the whole fight, I only have to be perfect for one second.”

Even so, Wilder believes Fury will provide him with a far harder night's work than the 'robotic' unified world heavyweight champion Anthony Joshua.

This December 1 clash was only made possible when Wilder snubbed a $15m offer to face Joshua, who instead defended his WBA, WBO and IBF belts against Alexander Povetkin, at Wembley Stadium.

Wilder could yet face Joshua if he beats Fury

There is still hope that Wilder and AJ will meet next year, on April 13 to be precise, but defeat to Fury will put a line through any such plans.

And when asked who would win out of Britain's two most famous heavyweights, Wilder said: “Fury, any given day, because of the awkwardness.

“When I consider Joshua he is too stiff, he is definitely robotic and he does not move his head. Fury is awkward, long, moves his body.

“A lot of people would think that he's not ready because he's been out of the ring for two years but the thing about a champion is that we know how to adjust, we know how many days or months we need to get ready.

“You don't get to be a champion without knowing the ropes, especially with him; you don't beat Klitschko without knowing how to get yourself in shape.

“That's what people have to understand. I don't think people have enough knowledge of the sport to really understand how a fighter transforms into peak condition.”

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in