Tyson Fury vs Deontay Wilder prize money: How much of the fight purse will each fighter get?

The fight will make Fury and Wilder richer than ever before - but don’t expect the British boxer to hold on to his millions for too long

Tyson Fury and Deontay Wilder clash in final press conference

Deontay Wilder leaves the Staples Centre on Saturday night as the WBC heavyweight champion but both he and Tyson Fury is also much, much richer despite the result.

Wilder (40-0-1) floored Fury (27-0-1) in the ninth and 12th rounds, yet Fury clearly outboxed Wilder for large portions of the remainder of their entertaining showdown at Staples Center.

Fury looked finished when Wilder put him flat on his back with two minutes left in the fight, but he rose and made it to the bell.

Judge Robert Tapper scored the fight 114-112 for Fury, while Alejandro Rochin favored Wilder 115-111. Judge Phil Edwards and The Associated Press scored it a 113-113 draw, with Wilder's knockdowns compensating for Fury's superior technique.

LIVE: Reaction from Fury vs Wilder from Los Angeles

Both men weren't overly upset by the verdict in front of a frenzied Hollywood crowd, embracing warmly and talking about a rematch.

Neither is exactly hard up for cash, given Fury’s 2015 victory over Wladimir Klitschko set him up for life while Wilder has made millions from his 40 professional fights.

But Saturday night’s bout will make both boxers considerably richer.

It’s understood that American Wilder stands to make $14m (£10.9m) from the fight against Fury, who himself will land an estimated $10m (£7.8m) for one night’s work in Los Angeles.

Fury produced a near-perfect performance

However, don’t expect Fury to be out splashing the cash anytime soon.

The self-proclaimed ‘Gypsy King’ has previous for using his fight earnings to give to charity and help those not as well off, and his plans after this fight will be no different.

“When I go home I’m going to build some homes for the homeless and set up some funds for drug addicts and alcoholics,” said Fury, drawing on his own recent experiences as reason for doing so.

“I was always going to do it but being here (in California) gives me that extra push to go and do it even more.

Fury dominated from the opening bell

“It has really opened my eyes to a lot of things and I’m leaving as a better person.

“It’s opened my eyes to see so many different cultures, so many different things happening and going on.”

Fury has spent the last nine weeks in LA preparing for the fight, but while he has been focussed on what will happen inside the ring come fight night, he cannot avoid what is happening outside of it in the surrounding area.

Wilder knocked Fury down twice

“There are a lot of homeless people on the streets here, more than I’ve ever seen ever in my life,” Fury added. “I’m staying in downtown LA but if you go five minutes down the road there’s like – I don’t know – thousands of homeless people.

“You think you might be in a third world country but it’s a crisis situation and something needs to be done about it.

“I’m just an outsider with an opinion but it’s a situation that is happening all over the world, especially in the UK as well.”

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