Stuart Broad finds his stride as England fight back in second Test against South Africa

England 269, South Africa 60-3: Broad clicked into gear to take two wickets on the morning of the second day with support from partner-in-crime James Anderson to bring the Test to life

Vithushan Ehantharajah
Newlands
Saturday 04 January 2020 11:46
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It was fair to say England did not cover themselves in glory on day one and left many runs out in the middle. But what problems they made for themselves were rectified with a strong opening bowling performance which sees South Africa 60-3.

Ollie Pope and James Anderson resumed what was left of the first innings batting in the morning, though South Africa needed just 14 minutes to take the final wicket. Anderson’s was the dismissal, edging Kagiso Rabada (three for 68) to Rassie van der Dussen at slip to leave England 269 all out. Pope finished unbeaten on 61.

The hosts started their batting in a bit of a hurry, 17 for no loss after two overs with debutant Pieter Malan scoring his first runs in Test cricket with a handy back-foot cut for four off the final ball of Anderson’s opening over. But from 26 for no loss, England clicked into gear and Stuart Broad – he of those spells – created a whirlwind from the Wynberg End.

In the space of 16 balls, the 34-year old had removed Malan (5) and Zubayr Hamza (5) with the kind of pace and bounce that some doubted he still had. The former should perhaps have done better, wafting at a delivery he should have left quite comfortably, giving Joe Root a sharp catch at first slip.

The second was all on the bowler and backed up by some exceptional work in the cordon from Ben Stokes. The allrounder, positioned at second slip, dived sharply and low to his right and claiming a catch that, this time, required no second-viewing from the TV umpire. He'd had two taken away in the first Test.

The third to fall also came from Broad’s end, albeit when he had completed his opening spell of six overs, four maidens, two for 12. Anderson, having switched ends, made use of what lay on a length to undo captain Faf du Plessis. He could do little about his, squared up a touch as the delivery moved off a length having coaxed him into a defensive shot. This time it was a more routine catch for Stokes.

England had a fourth wicket when Anderson looked to have trapped Van der Dussen in front. Alas, a huge inside edge, which was not originally spotted by umpire Paul Reiffel, saved the right-hander. Nevertheless, he and Dean Elgar – a picture of serenity with 35 of the 60 runs to his name – will lunch knowing they’ll need to be together till tea to recalibrate their morning turmoil. They trail by 209.

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