Tom Harrison reiterates desire to continue as ECB chief executive as batting coach Graham Thorpe departs

The ECB chief executive insists he retains the support of the board despite a challenging 2021

George Sessions
Friday 04 February 2022 12:08
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Tom Harrison is eager to lead the England and Wales Cricket Board through its current problems (Victoria Jones/PA)
Tom Harrison is eager to lead the England and Wales Cricket Board through its current problems (Victoria Jones/PA)

Tom Harrison has reiterated his desire to continue as England and Wales Cricket Board chief executive and insisted he will not run away from the challenges facing the organisation.

Chris Silverwood, Ashley Giles and Graham Thorpe have all lost their jobs in the wake of a 4-0 Ashes loss, which followed a poor 2021 where nine out of 15 Tests ended in defeat and England exited the Twenty20 World Cup in the semi-final stage.

Batting coach Thorpe said on Friday: “I have been very fortunate to have worked with so many good players and coaches who I consider my friends for life.”

Away from on the field, the ECB and Harrison have faced scrutiny for their role in the racism crisis which has hit cricket in the wake of Azeem Rafiq’s allegations of racism and bullying during his time at Yorkshire.

Speaking from Lord’s on Friday, Harrison said: “I think what I would like to do is not to be seen running away from the challenges of addressing the issues.

“We are in a particular moment where we have an interim chair, we’re looking for a full-time chair, and we have a lot of discussions under way.

I want to take English cricket back to a place where there is stability and calmness frankly in the environment, and there is a sense we are heading in the right direction.

Tom Harrison

“This is a moment where I think I have the support of the board and it is a very tough moment. Honestly the toughest moments I have experienced in my career but I just feel I need to, until literally I feel it is the right moment, keep going.

“I want to take English cricket back to a place where there is stability and calmness frankly in the environment, and there is a sense we are heading in the right direction.”

He continued: “We do have to reflect hard on what happened (at the Ashes) but I am not saying I am clinging on for grim death, that is not what I am doing. I am doing this because I think it is the right thing for English cricket right now and as soon as that is not the case, you will not have to push me.”

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