Why FA Cup third round games are kicking off a minute late this weekend

Football Association will use the 32 matches across the FA Cup third round to promote their mental health campaign Heads Up

Jack de Menezes
Saturday 04 January 2020 12:36
Comments
Prince William FA Cup mental health awareness

All FA Cup third-round fixtures will kick-off a minute late this weekend as part of the Football Association’s Heads Up campaign, with the sport urging fans to use the time to think about their own mental health and self-wellness.

Six games will start at 12:31pm on Saturday afternoon, with a further nine matches beginning at 3:01pm and the final five fixtures of the days kicking off at 5:31pm.

It will continue across the rest of the weekend, with nine games scheduled for 2:01pm on Sunday.

The Merseyside derby will begin at 4:01pm when Liverpool face Everton on Sunday afternoon, while Gillingham’s clash with West Ham will start at the unusual time of 6:16pm, with Arsenal versus Leeds wrapping up the weekend at 7:56pm on Monday night.

The move is the latest in a series of efforts to get football fans and, in particular, young men to open up and talk about any issues with their mental and emotional health, in an attempt to break down stereotypical barriers that can cause serious illness among young adults.

The campaign is being spearheaded by HRH Prince William, with a video narrated by the Duke of Cambridge to be played that features Chelsea manager Frank Lampard, Tottenham midfielder Dele Alli, Sky Sports pundit Chris Kamara and other leading figures from the sport.

A statement from the FA said: "It is hoped that the initiative will raise awareness of the importance of looking after our mental health, with 60 seconds representing just the first step in the journey to improved wellbeing.

"During the minute delay, fans will be encouraged to consider the positive impact 60 seconds can have on their own wellbeing or in supporting a friend or family member.

"Spearheaded by HRH The Duke of Cambridge, the Heads Up campaign harnesses the influence and popularity of football to encourage more people – particularly men – to feel comfortable talking about, and taking action to improve, their mental health and to recognise that mental fitness is just as important as physical fitness."

The FA's chief executive Mark Bullingham said: “Whilst delaying kick-off times by 60 seconds is a simple idea, it provides a powerful platform for us and our Heads Up charity partners to deliver a really important message on mental health.

“We know that men in particular can be reluctant to talk about the subject, so it is important that we use football as a vehicle to stress the importance of mental fitness.”

A YouGov survey commissioned by Public Health England shows men in England are less likely than women to seek help or take self-care actions for early signs of common mental health concerns (45 per cent had never taken action compared to 31 per cent of women).

It also found of those who did take steps to manage or improve their mental health, 73 per cent wish they had done it sooner.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in