Tottenham fear Christian Eriksen could have ‘chronic’ stomach injury, claims Denmark coach Age Hareide

The midfielder has not played for Spurs since September 22 with an abdominal problem

Liam Twomey
Tuesday 09 October 2018 07:59
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Tottenham Hotspur midfielder Christian Eriksen may miss significant time with a “chronic” stomach injury, according to Denmark coach Age Hareide.

Eriksen has not played for Spurs since their 2-1 victory at Brighton on September 22 due to an abdominal issue. In his absence Mauricio Pochettino’s men beat Huddersfield Town and Cardiff City in the Premier League, but were taken to penalties by Watford in the EFL Cup third round and suffered a convincing Champions League defeat at home to Barcelona.

Tottenham have declined to clarify the severity of Eriksen’s injury, but Hareide is not confident of convincing Pochettino to make the 26-year-old available for Denmark's meeting with the Republic of Ireland on October 13 in Dublin in the Uefa Nations League.

“Such an injury can be chronic, and it is true that Tottenham also fears that,” Hareide said of Eriksen’s problem, speaking to Denmark's Canal 9.

“It is doubtful whether we will lure him to Dublin and make him play. I do not think that Tottenham is particularly interested in that.”

Denmark’s other international engagement in October is a friendly with Austria in Herning, and Hareide is not expecting to be able to call upon Eriksen for some time.

Eriksen has registered two assists in six Premier League appearances this season

Asked how long he expects his star midfielder to be sidelined, the Denmark coach replied: “I do not really know. You should ask our doctor.”

Eriksen’s absence is made worse for Tottenham by the fact that Danny Rose (groin), Jan Vertonghen (hamstring), Mousa Dembele (thigh), Dele Alli (hamstring) and Serge Aurier (thigh) are also unavailable to Pochettino due to injury, with World Cup exertions cited as one of the primary causes of Spurs’ recent spate of muscle problems.

Earlier this week Pochettino criticised the introduction of the Uefa Nations League for removing an opportunity for players to get some much needed recovery time during the season.

“It’s dangerous,” the Tottenham manager said. “I've told you before that it’s so difficult [for the players]. Football is massive business and it’s not easy. The football business today does not care about the players – it’s all about games, games, games.

“It’s so difficult to understand this competition. You finish the World Cup then first international break you have to compete again in an official tournament. It’s better to say to the player: ‘training, rest, recovery.’

“Then they need to go and I understand the national team wants their best players, always. The problem is always for the clubs. It’s so difficult for the clubs. Our position is to understand the players, the national team, understand FIFA, UEFA, VAR, referees but who understands us? It’s so difficult.”

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