Sam Allardyce: Chico Flores mocks England manager on Twitter with 'Thug Life' edit of Upton Park flare-up

The pair famously clashed on the side-lines during Allardyce’s spell as West Ham United manager

Tuesday 27 September 2016 12:48
Comments
Chico Flores posted the mocking image on Twitter on Tuesday
Chico Flores posted the mocking image on Twitter on Tuesday

Chico Flores, the former Swansea City defender, has mocked England manager Sam Allardyce after he was embroiled in a newspaper sting which has thrown his future at the Football Association into doubt.

The pair famously clashed on the side-lines during Allardyce’s spell as West Ham United manager when the 61-year-old roared with laughter into the Spaniard’s face when he appeared to dive under a tame challenge during a Premier League clash between the sides in 2014.

Flores was subject to derision on social media following the incident with it being replayed endlessly in the time which has since elapsed. However, Allardyce, now England manager, is reportedly on the verge of being sacked for engaging with undercover reporters from the Daily Telegraph over “getting around” third party transfer rules.

Incorporating the shaded sunglasses and marijuana cigarette intrinsic with the “Thug Life” social media craze, Flores posted a picture appearing to gloat about Allardyce’s plight to his 49,000 Twitter followers on Tuesday afternoon.

Receiving over 2,000 re-tweets in less than 30 minutes, the post was preceded by a cryptic message consisting of three laughing emoticons in the wake of the damaging revelations about Allardyce’s conduct since replacing Roy Hodgson at the FA.

The FA told The Sun it is aware of the allegations and are awaiting a full transcript of the meetings before commenting further.

A spokesman told the Telegraph: “We have asked the Daily Telegraph to provide us with the full facts in relation to this matter.”

According to Mail Online, FA chairman Greg Clarke said last night: “I want all the facts, to hear everything from everyone and make a judgment about what to do. Natural justice requires us to get to the bottom of the issues before we make any decision.”

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in