Liverpool becomes third Premier League club to commit to real living wage

The Merseyside club joins Chelsea and Everton in signing up to the RLW initiative

Samuel Lovett@samueljlovett
Friday 03 November 2017 12:08
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As of June 2018, Liverpool’s employees can expect to be paid £8.45 per hour
As of June 2018, Liverpool’s employees can expect to be paid £8.45 per hour

Liverpool have become the third Premier League club to commit to paying its staff, including match-day casuals, the real living wage.

The Merseyside club joins Chelsea and Everton in signing up to the RLW initiative.

As of June 2018, Liverpool’s employees can expect to be paid £8.45 per hour – 95p more than the legal minimum.

The real living wage exceeds the minimum wage, which is determined by workers’ ages, and is calculated by taking into account the costs of genuine working families’ needs.

Liverpool, who employ around 1,000 part-time staff on match days, have reached the agreement after discussions with the Living Wage Foundation and Steve Rotheram, the mayor of the Liverpool City Region.

“We hope that this development demonstrates how highly we value all of those who work for Liverpool Football Club in whatever capacity that may be,” said Liverpool chief executive, Peter Moore.

“During the course of our discussions with both Steve and the Living Wage Foundation we examined a range of issues but the intention of all involved, not least ourselves, was always the same – to reach an outcome which would be of greatest benefit to our workforce.

“As a club, we have paid the national minimum wage at the higher rate only for many years and in June this year we ensured that all directly employed staff were paid at least the real living wage. By taking the next step, we are not adhering to an obligation, we are doing it because we feel it is the right thing to do.”

Rotheram added: “As mayor of the Liverpool City Region, I am delighted that Liverpool Football Club has taken this step and is now committed to becoming a Real Living Wage Employer. Not only does it show them to be a responsible and progressive employer that respects and fairly rewards all its employees, but their status as one of the world’s biggest football clubs means that their actions in this respect have set an example which others will hopefully now follow.”

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