Premier League players to be consulted over 30% pay cut

Wage deferral measure is designed to protect the employment of non-playing staff during the pandemic

Coronavirus: How has sport been affected?

Premier League clubs have unanimously “agreed to consult their players” over a 30 per cent wage cut in order to protect the employment of non-playing staff during the coronavirus pandemic.

A meeting between all 20 member clubs was held on Friday afternoon, with players under overwhelming pressure to accept pay cuts after Health Secretary Matt Hancock called on them “to play their part”.

The Premier League also announced that it would be donating £20m to the National Health Service.

A statement released by the Premier League read: “In the face of substantial and continuing losses for the 2019/20 season since the suspension of matches began, and to protect employment throughout the professional game, Premier League clubs unanimously agreed to consult their players regarding a combination of conditional reductions and deferrals amounting to 30 per cent of total annual remuneration.

“This guidance will be kept under constant review as circumstances change.

“The League will be in regular contact with the PFA, and the union will join a meeting which will be held tomorrow between the League, players and club representatives.”

​It was also determined that a possible restart to the season in May would be impossible in the current climate, with the league’s suspension now indefinite, although there remains a firm collective commitment to completing the 2019/20 campaign.

“It was acknowledged that the Premier League will not resume at the beginning of May – and that the 2019-20 season will only return when it is safe and appropriate to do so,” the statement continued.

“The restart date is under constant review with all stakeholders, as the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic develops and we work together through this very challenging time.”

The Premier League also announced its intention to assist the EFL and the National League, with clubs at that level hardest hit by the loss of matchday revenue.

“Discussions also took place regarding financial relief for clubs in the short term and while there is no single solution, measures are to be put in place to immediately deal with the impact of falling cash flow.

“Critically, the league unanimously voted to advance funds of £125m to the EFL and National League as it is aware of the severe difficulties clubs throughout the football pyramid are suffering at this time.”

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