World Cup 2018: Neymar suffers fresh injury in training to same foot he broke to spark Brazil fears

Paris Saint-Germain forward was helped away from training on Tuesday

Jack de Menezes
Tuesday 19 June 2018 17:18
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Neymar appears to be injured in video showing him limping during practice

Neymar has provided Brazil with a fresh injury concern after he limped out of training on Tuesday, sparking fears he could miss their second World Cup Group E clash with Costa Rica this Friday.

The Paris Saint-Germain forward winced in pain after kicking a football during a fairly training tame training drill, three days after becoming the most fouled player at the World Cup in the last 20 years after he was targeted during the 1-1 draw with Switzerland.

Neymar left the Rostov Arena limping but told media that there was nothing to worry about, and his appearance in training on Tuesday allayed any fears that he had suffered yet another heartbreaking injury at a World Cup following his 2014 anguish.

But those fears quickly returned when he pulled up soon after kicking the ball, and after briefly attempting to continue training, the 26-year-old was led away by the team’s medical staff for further assessment.

The news is a huge concern for Brazil head coach Tite, given that Neymar has only just returned from a broken foot after suffering a fractured metatarsal while playing for PSG in the Champions League last February.

The injury forced Neymar to miss the remainder of the season, and the sight of him holding his right foot once again during training on Tuesday at the Yug Sport Stadium in Sochi will lead Brazil fans to fear the worst.

Neymar suffered an injury during training on Tuesday
The Brazilian was led away by medical staff

However, the Brazilian Football Association [CFB] moved to ease any fears over a long-term injury by confirmed he had “complained of ankle pains due to the number of fouls suffered against Switzerland”, and that he is expected to return to training on Wednesday.

Neymar struggled to make an impact in Brazil’s opening fixture in Russia as Philippe Coutinho gave the Selecao the lead, only for Steven Zuber to equalise shortly after half-time, and the game was most noted for the treatment that the former Barcelona forward received at the hands of the Swiss as he was repeatedly fouled in an effort to prevent him from getting through on goal.

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