Robert Wickens crash: IndyCar driver broke both legs in horror Pocono crash as well as spine and lung injuries

Canadian driver was involved in a horrifying crash in Sunday’s ABC Supply 500 at Pocono Raceway when he tangled with championship contender Ryan Hunter-Reay

Indycar crash leaves driver Robert Wickens in hospital

Canadian driver Robert Wickens suffered two broken legs as well as injuries to his spine, lungs and right arm in a horror crash during the weekend’s IndyCar race at Pocono Raceway.

The 29-year-old was involved in a high-speed accident with Ryan Hunter-Reay on the tri-oval, with his Schmidt Peterson Motorsports Dallara-Honda flying through the air and into the outside safety barrier, sending his car into a series of violent spins as he came back down the track and into the path of oncoming drivers.

A statement from IndyCar officials on Sunday said that Wickens was “awake and alert”, which led to widespread relief across the paddock after the race was stopped for him to be extracted from his cockpit – which was all that was left by the wreck – and the track to be cleaned up and repaired.

Wickens and Hunter-Reay made contact while running wheel-to-wheel
Robert Wickens was involved in a horror crash during an IndyCar race in Pocono
The Dallara-Honda momentarily caught fire as Wickens travelled back down the track
Wickns' car spun across the track into oncoming traffic

Schmidt Peterson Motorsports have now revealed the full extent of Wickens’ injuries, with the driver being treated at Lehigh Valley Hospital Cedar Crest in Allentown. “Schmidt Peterson Motosports driver Robert Wickens is being treated for injuries to his lower extremities, right arm and spine following an incident in the ABC Supply 500 at Pocono Raceway. He also sustained a pulmonary contusion.

“He will undergo an MRI and probable surgery at Lehigh Valley Hospital – Cedar Crest.”

The accident brought back harrowing memories of the crash that claimed British driver Justin Wilson’s life at the same race track three years ago when he was struck on the head by debris, and a number of drivers expressed their concern for Wickens following the stoppage.

“All we can hope for is that everybody is going to be ok," championship leader Scott Dixon said.

Championship rival Alexander Rossi added: "All 22 of us, 33 of us, whatever it may be, are a family. We try our best to look after each other out there. You don't want to see that happen to anyone. We'll continue to think of him and pray for him, his family, his fiancée; all that they have to deal with."

Rossi went on to win the race and cut Dixon’s series lead to 29 points, but thoughts were still with Wickens as the weekend came to a close.

"I know he is in good hands. Hopefully, we'll see him back in the car soon," said James Hinchcliffe, who helped bring Wickens to IndyCar following a successful stint in Europe.

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