Rugby World Cup 2019: Cory Hill ruled out by Wales after failing to recover from leg fracture

Hill has been battling to overcome the injury throughout summer and has not played since February

Rugby World Cup: Wales in profile

Cory Hill has been ruled out of WalesRugby World Cup campaign, with the lock due to return to the UK to continue his recovery from a leg stress fracture.

Hill, who has been battling to overcome the injury throughout summer and has not played since February, was on course to feature in Wales’ warm-up fixtures but a setback delayed his expected return date until the World Cup.

There were hopes the 27-year-old would be fit to face Australia in this weekend’s Pool D showdown, but after the latest medical assessment Hill has failed to prove his fitness for the tournament.

Ospreys lock Bradley Davies is set to replace Hill in Warren Gatland’s 31-man World Cup squad.

A Welsh Rugby Union statement read: "Cory Hill has been released from Wales’ 2019 Rugby World Cup squad after being unable to recover significantly from a stress fracture of his fibula. He will return to Wales and continue his recovery with his region.

"Bradley Davies, capped 65 times by Wales and who has featured in two previous Rugby World Cups, has been named as his injury replacement and will arrive in Japan on Wednesday."

There was also concern over Hadleigh Parkes after it emerged he had suffered “a bit of a bone fracture” in his hand during Monday’s opening win over Georgia.

But the centre is not expected to be a fitness issue for Sunday’s meeting with the Wallabies.

Fly-half Dan Biggar suffered a cut under his chin during the warm-up, but he went on to deliver a solid display as Wales began their campaign in six-try fashion.

The Six Nations champions delivered a strong statement of intent less than a week before tackling Australia as they put Georgia to the sword during a dominant first-half display.

Wales had a bonus point wrapped up by half-time after tries from centre Jonathan Davies, flanker Justin Tipuric, wing Josh Adams and full-back Liam Williams, with Biggar kicking three conversions and a penalty.

And although the second period proved a much tighter affair – tries by hooker Shalva Mamukashvili and replacement prop Levan Chilachava accurately reflected a stirring Georgia recovery – Wales were never threatened.

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