Rugby World Cup 2019: England left stranded at Tokyo airport in wake of Typhoon Faxai

Typhoon Faxai has left half of the city cut off due to travel chaos, leaving the England squad stranded on their very first day in Japan

Jack de Menezes
Tokyo
Monday 09 September 2019 10:13
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Rugby World Cup 2019: All you need to know

England’s Rugby World Cup campaign has hit an early roadblock after the squad were left stranded at Tokyo Narita International Airport following Typhoon Faxai.

Eddie Jones and his squad landed in the Japanese capital at 1:46pm, roughly seven hours after the typhoon had passed through overnight in what proved the 15th worst storm to ever hit the city.

England’s BA 005 departure avoided any of the 105mph winds that Faxai brought shortly after midnight, but the lasting effects brought Tokyo to a standstill on Monday.

Following an hour-long wait before disembarking from their British Airways plane named ‘Sweet Chariot’ due to the shortage of buses, they were then told that their transfer into Tokyo was unable to reach the airport because of congestion.

It left England stranded at Narita International more than four hours after they landed as their transfer was unable to reach the airport, while no trains were running central to where their hotel is based 66km away from Narita on Monday evening.

England could have flown into Tokyo Haneda International, which is located some 20km away from the team hotel and was operating with short delays but full road and train access.

The squad are due to spend one night in Tokyo before travelling by air on Tuesday to Miyazaki in the south of the country, where they will hold a 10-day training camp before the start of the Rugby World Cup.

England at least made it to Tokyo, as rivals Australia saw their flight cancelled on Sunday before it took off, leaving the Wallabies at home until the following day.

Upon arrival, England head coach Jones did at least express his happiness with arriving in the country of his heritage, with the Australian returning to Japan four years after leaving the national team to take the England job.

"We are excited to arrive in Japan, it is a great honour and privilege to represent England and we are looking forward to the tournament," said Jones.

"This is a unique World Cup. It's the first time in a tier-two nation so our ability to adapt quickly will be imperative.

England's rugby team was left stranded at Tokyo Narita International following Typhoon Faxai

"Every one of the 20 teams goes into the World Cup with the target of being at their best. We think we have prepared well so we have put ourselves in a good position."

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