Andy Murray refuses to back Novak Djokovic’s breakaway players’ group

Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal have also called for unity rather than division

Sudipto Ganguly
Sunday 30 August 2020 12:44
Comments
Andy Murray: Resurfacing - trailer

Former men’s world number one tennis player Andy Murray says he is not currently in favour of a breakaway players’ group led by Novak Djokovic and has urged fellow athletes to give the governing body more time to tackle their concerns.

Top-ranked Djokovic, Canadian Vasek Pospisil and American John Isner resigned from the players’ council of the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) after other members formally asked them to step down.

“After today’s successful meeting, we are excited to announce the beginning of the Professional Tennis Players Association (PTPA), the first player-only association in tennis since 1972,” Djokovic posted on social media, with a picture of more than 60 players on court at the U.S. Open venue.

Djokovic has said their intention was not to disrupt the existing ATP tour but offer a platform for players to be better heard on decisions that affect their livelihoods.

The move has provoked resistance from the two most successful players in men’s tennis, Roger Federer and Rafa Nadal, who are also part of the players’ council, while the sport’s world governing bodies have urged unity.

Andy Murray called for unity between players

“I won’t be signing it today,” three-times Grand Slam winner Murray said ahead of the US Open. “I’m not totally against a player union, player association, but right now there’s a couple of things: One is I feel like the current management that are in place should be given some time to implement their vision,” he told reporters.

“Whether that works out, or not, would potentially influence me in the future as to which way I would go.”

The ATP governs the men’s professional tour and former Italian professional player Andrea Gaudenzi took over as the chairman in January for a four-year term.Murray also opposed the PTPA on the grounds that is a body only for male athletes, since he believed a combined entity with women players would send “a much more powerful message”.

Belgian Kim Clijsters, a four-time Grand Slam singles winner, felt the women’s WTA tour has been “very well run over the years” but there was always room for improvement.

The 37-year-old, who returned from retirement for the third time in her career in 2020, said she was a little surprised to hear about the PTPA but wanted to know more about it.

Men’s world number five Daniil Medvedev also sought more information and time before making a decision on the new association.

And Greek Stefanos Tsitsipas, ranked a spot behind Russian Medvedev, said, “I haven’t been involved at all, like zero. I have nothing to do with this.

He added: “I don’t even know what they’re talking about. I’m not following.”

Reuters

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in