Wimbledon: Andy Murray's world number one ranking on line for the first time, with Rafa Nadal ready to pounce

Murray takes on Benoit Paire in the fourth round of Wimbledon today, and could lose his world number one ranking for the very first time

Tom White
Wimbledon
Monday 10 July 2017 12:18
Comments
Murray could lose his world number one ranking today
Murray could lose his world number one ranking today

Andy Murray takes on Benoit Paire at Wimbledon on Monday with his world number one ranking on the line for the first time.

Since ascending to top spot in November, Murray has been out in front as tennis' top man despite an indifferent start to this season.

He has been more impressive in progressing to the second week in search of his third Wimbledon title, winning in straight sets against Alexander Bublik and Dustin Brown before coming through a tougher test against Fabio Fognini.

In terms of the rankings, though, the Scot must keep pushing forward in the tournament if he is to defend his position.

With the rankings working on a 12-month rolling system, Murray's Wimbledon title last year means he is defending the maximum 2,000 points and must lift the trophy again simply to remain on his pre-tournament points total of 9,390.

And the presence of Rafael Nadal as his nearest challenger steps up the pressure - the world number two missed last year's tournament due to injury, so whatever points he earns this time around represent "profit" over his existing 7,285.

Andre Agassi on Wimbledon tournament favourites

The pair are on course to meet in the semi-finals, meaning if they both reach that stage it will represent a straight fight for top spot.

However, Nadal's progress to round four has already earned him 180 points, leaving the Spaniard within striking distance as he plays Gilles Muller on Court One on Monday, in parallel to Murray's outing on Centre.

Victory would lift Nadal to 7,645 points and counting, while if Murray loses he would end the tournament on 7,570 - a combination which would see the number one ranking change hands when the table is officially updated after the championships.

Novak Djokovic has already done enough to pass first-round casualty Stan Wawrinka for third place in the rankings, with Roger Federer also still in contention to overhaul his Swiss compatriot.

Any of Murray, Nadal and Djokovic could end the tournament as world number one, though the latter would need to win the title with neither Murray nor Nadal progressing beyond the quarter-finals.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in