UFC 226 results: Brock Lesnar storms Octagon to confront Daniel Cormier after historic victory over Stipe Miocic

Cormier added the heavyweight title to his light heavyweight championship, but had no time to celebrate as former champion Lesnar marched into the Octagon and shoved him out of his way

James Edwards
Sunday 08 July 2018 11:50
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Brock Lesnar confronts Daniel Cormier after his victory over Stipe Miocic
Brock Lesnar confronts Daniel Cormier after his victory over Stipe Miocic

UFC International Fight Week 2018 culminated in Las Vegas on Saturday evening with Daniel Cormier making history and setting up a blockbuster future showdown with Brock Lesnar.

UFC 226 rounded off another eventful week in UFC history with an event headlined by a champion vs champion showdown between heavyweight king Stipe Miocic and light heavyweight titleholder Daniel Cormier.

Only Miocic's UFC heavyweight title was on the line in the main event, but both men knew that a win would immortalise them in the MMA history books in a fight that was all about solidifying a legacy as one of the greatest fighters of all time.

Stipe Miocic kicks Daniel Cormier during their UFC 226 bout

Those who believed that weight would play a factor in the fight were given a surprise on Friday when Cormier weighed in the heavier of the two champions on the scales. Miocic came in a 242.5lbs, whilst Cormier, who usually struggles to make the 205lbs weight limit, tipped the scales at a hefty 246lbs, the heaviest he'd been since he fought in Strikeforce back in 2011.

Miocic's five-inch height and eight-inch reach advantages were expected to play a big factor on the night but the heavyweight champion closed the range quickly in the opening minute of the fight and he pushed Cormier up against the cage where he looked to land short punches and knees before the two broke apart.

Stipe Miocic lands a right hand on Daniel Cormier

Cormier took some shots early on in the opening round but he returned fire with a stiff jab and right hook which marked up Miocic's face. The fight was briefly paused around the four minute mark following an eye poke to Miocic, but unbekown to him the ending was nigh.

Dormier negated any weight advantage by coming the heavier fighter

The two fighters exchanged big right hands before clinching each other but as they broke away Cormier landed a right hand over the top as he exited and Miocic was sent straight to the mat. Cormier followed up with ground strikes but Miocic was already out as referee Marc Goddard called a stop to the contest as the crowd erupted.

Cormier was then announced the new UFC heavyweight champion but even before the belt was around his waist his first challenger appeared as WWE superstar Brock Lesnar made his way out from backstage. Joe Rogan then attempted to interview Cormier but the new champion simply grabbed the microphone and ordered Lesnar to get in the Octagon.

Lesnar obliged and then marched up the steps before pushing Cormier in the chest. The two then exchanged verbals on the microphone and sowed the seeds for a future fight down the line. It was a crazy end to a historic moment as Cormier became only the second man in UFC history to hold titles in two different divisions simultaneously.

Ngannou and Lewis booed out the building in the co-main event

Max Holloway was expected to defend his UFC featherweight title in the co-main event of the evening but after he was pulled from the fight card mid-week having suffering a suspected concussion, the heavyweight bout between Francis Ngannou and Derrick Lewis was promoted to the co-main event.

The visual of seeing two of the biggest and scariest looking men in the UFC go face-to-face was a sight to behold but the atmosphere in the arena quickly turned to one of frustration when the two barely exchanged at all in the opening round.

The angst in the crowd grew in the second round as the fans pulled out their phones and waved them above their heads as they chanted "fight, fight, fight" as Ngannou and Lewis simply stalked each other around the cage. With time close to expiring in the second round referee Herb Dean called a stop to the fight and spoke to both fighters about their lack of willingness to attack; unfortunately, even then neither managed to land a significant blow before the end of the round.

Referee Dean continued to encourage both men to attack in round three but they continued to struggle to produce any output as the fans whistled and jeered. With 90-seconds left on the clock, a Mexican Wave started up in the arena as the 15,000 strong crowd entertained themselves as Lewis and Ngannou just circled their way around the Octagon.

Derrick Lewis celebrates after defeating Francis Ngannou at UFC 226

The fight ended with the crowd on their feet loudly voicing their dissatisfaction as both Ngannou and Lewis made their way back to their corners knowing they'd served up possibly one of the worst fights in UFC history.

Lewis got the nod via a unanimous decision on the scorecards, but the statement was made when the UFC called an audible and refused to give him any time on the microphone after the fight. Seemingly the UFC bosses wanted both fighters out of the arena as quickly as possible and it was a wise decision given the unrest in the crowd.

Perry edges Felder in a bloody battle

Welterweight Mike Perry got back to winning ways with a split decision win over late replacement Paul Felder.

Perry was expected to face Yancy Medeiros but just seven days away from fight night the Hawaiian pulled out of the fight injured and Felder stepped in short notice and stepped up a weight class.

Mike Perry, right, hits Paul Felder during their welterweight bout at UFC 226

Blood was drawn as early as the opening exchanges as the two clashed heads and cuts appeared on both of their foreheads. Despite their crimson masks, neither man took a step back during the entire 15-minutes as they stood toe-to-toe and traded big hooks, spinning backfists and elbows in what was a gruelling battle of attrition.

Felder did well to give as good as he’s got, but Perry landed the heavier blows and his strength in the clinch appeared to be the difference between the two on the night.

Unsurprisingly, Perry was the man who got his hand raised via a decision, but Felder certainly did himself a good service stepping up in weight and on short notice to give a fantastic display of bravery and technical striking.

Pettis makes a statement with a submission win over Chiesa

Elsewhere on the card, former UFC lightweight champion Anthony Pettis showed signs of being back to his best with a terrific submission victory of Michael Chiesa.

Pettis had lost four of his last six bouts since losing his 155-pounds title in 2015 but last night he weathered an early storm before then submitting Chiesa early in the second round with a beautiful triangle-armbar submission.

Anthony Pettis celebrates after defeating Michael Chiesa at UFC 226

It's early days to say he can get back to the levels he displayed during his time at the UFC lightweight champion, but if he can string together a series of wins and performances like last evening, it won't be long before his back in the title mix at 155-pounds.

UFC 226 Full Results

Daniel Cormier def. Stipe Miocic via KO (punches) - Round 1, 4:33

Derrick Lewis def. Francis Ngannou via split decision (29-28, 29-28, 30-27)

Mike Perry def. Paul Felder via split decision (29-28, 28-29, 29-28)

Anthony Pettis def. Michael Chiesa via submission (triangle armbar) – Round 2, 0:52

Khalil Rountree def. Gokhan Saki via knockout (punches) – Round 1, 1:36

Paulo Costa def. Uriah Hall via TKO (punches) – Round 2, 2:38

Raphael Assuncao def. Rob Font via unanimous decision (30-27, 30-27, 30-27)

Drakkar Klose def. Lando Vannata via unanimous decision (30-27, 30-27, 30-27)

Curtis Millender def. Max Griffin via unanimous decision (29-28, 29-28, 29-28)

Dan Hooker def. Gilbert Burns via knockout (punches) – Round 1, 2:28

Emily Whitmire def. Jamie Moyle via unanimous decision (29-28, 29-28, 29-28)

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