Thousands of students prepare to march through London in National Campaign Against Fees and Cuts’ demonstration

Group behind the demonstration says students are not just marching for one day, but are 'building a movement which can strike to win'

A similar demonstration in November last year brought more than 10,000 protesters out onto the streets of London
A similar demonstration in November last year brought more than 10,000 protesters out onto the streets of London

Thousands of students, including protest groups, are gearing up for a mass demonstration which will take place through the streets of London tomorrow calling for free education across England and Wales.

Organised by the National Campaign Against Fees and Cuts (NCAFC), the group said protesters will march under the slogan ‘FREE EDUCATION - NO BARRIERS, NO BORDERS, NO BUSINESS’ after the Government recently announced plans to abolish maintenance grants, instead, turning them into loans.

The NCAFC said the move will leave the poorest students in ‘more and more debt’ after years of fee increases, calling the Government’s move a ‘concerted attempt to turn higher education into a market system, run like a business, with more and more provision privatised and outsourced’.

Deborah Hermanns, who is involved in the campaign with the group described, how the fight for free education will not end once the demonstration is over. She said: “We are not just marching for one day and for the abolition of fees. We are building a movement which can strike to win, just as other movements all over the world have won.”

Backed by the National Union of Students (NUS), the NCAFC said the protest is also backed by Unite the Union and will be attended by students from over forty campuses, adding how it has also been personally endorsed and promoted by Jeremy Corbyn.

The NCAFC has confirmed the route the march will take through London tomorrow

A similar march late last year attracted more than 10,000 protesters. Tomorrow, though, the NCAFC has highlighted how the march will begin at 12pm on Malet Street - the former University of London Union - and will pass by key points across the capital including Parliament Square. the Home Office, and the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills.

As well as calling for free education, the group added how the march will also highlight the rights of migrants and international students who face an ‘increasing and constant surveillance and intimidation, as well as financial exploitation’.

Speaking of the election of Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, Hope Worsdale, of Warwick for Free Education, said: “Students will be keeping him to his promises of free education and pushing him to promote free education not just for home students, but also for those from outside the UK.”

For more information on the NCAFC and its work, visit the site here

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in