Amazon Alexa: New Echo devices put virtual assistant inside glasses, a ring and your ears

Andrew Griffin
Thursday 26 September 2019 08:42
Comments
Dave Limp, senior vice president for Amazon devices and services, talks about Echo Buds, the tech company's new wireless earbuds product, Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2019, at an event in Seattle
Dave Limp, senior vice president for Amazon devices and services, talks about Echo Buds, the tech company's new wireless earbuds product, Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2019, at an event in Seattle

Amazon is putting Alexa into glasses, people's ears and on their hands, with a whole host of new Echo devices.

The company revealed a suite of more traditional smart speakers, too, while looking to soothe privacy concerns about how they listen in on their users.

Amazon - along with other tech firms with AI assistants - has come under scrutiny about their privacy practices in recent months following revelations about industry-wide schemes which see audio data from user interactions with software such as Alexa being listened to and analysed by human staff.

Critics accused tech companies of not clearly stating that other people may hear the recordings as part of the programmes, which were carried out to help improve speech recognition technology.

In response to the outcry, Amazon said it would give users the option to opt-out of having humans analyse their audio, while others have "paused" their programmes entirely.

At its media event on Wednesday, Amazon devices boss Dave Limp said the company was committed to user privacy and that it was "foundational" to every device the firm makes.

He also announced several new Alexa features he said had been designed to give users more control over their data.

It includes the ability to ask Alexa what the assistant heard and a new auto-delete tool which will automatically wipe all a user's saved audio recordings every three or 18 months.

Mr Limp argued that a service "can't be private unless you give them (customers) this control".

He also revealed Amazon had been improving the wake word engine which powers Alexa's understanding of when it hears its own name and begins recording.

Mr Limp said it had become 50% more accurate in the last 12 months, reducing the number of false wakes and unintentional recording of private conversations.

Among the new Echo devices unveiled was a music playing-focused speaker called Echo Studio, which includes the most powerful speakers used with an Echo device, capable of playing high definition audio.

The Echo Dot was also updated with an LED display to show the time, while the company also introduced the Echo Flex - which builds Alexa into a plug and can be placed in locations where wires or a larger speaker can not normally fit.

Another notable announcement involved the introduction of celebrity voices to the platform, with actor Samuel L Jackson the first option to be announced, which will roll out in the United States later this year.

Additional reporting by agencies

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in