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Apple sued for 'enabling porn addiction'

36-year-old Chris Sevier blames the company for his wife leaving him

A man looks at his Apple iPad in front an Apple logo outside an Apple store in downtown Shanghai March 16, 2012. REUTERS/Aly Song
A man looks at his Apple iPad in front an Apple logo outside an Apple store in downtown Shanghai March 16, 2012. REUTERS/Aly Song

Chris Sevier, a 36-year-old attorney from Nashville, Tennessee, is suing Apple on the grounds that their products allowed him to access pornography, leading to an addiction and a separation from his wife.

In a 50-page complain Sevier claims that his addiction begun “accidently”, when he was attempted to access Facebook, but accidently replaced the letters “a-c-e” with “u-c-k”. Sevier said that this ‘F***book’ site “appealed to his biological sensibilities as a male”. He also alleged that porn actresses online were “unfair competition” to his wife.

The lengthy description of Sevier’s downfall includes accusations that Apple peddle "explicit sexual content which has led to the proliferation of arousal addiction, sex trafficking, prostitution, and countless numbers of destroyed lives."

Sevier requested that Apple sell its products with an automatic filter to block pornography. Buyers over the age of 18 who wish to unlock the internet would be free to write to Apple and sign a form showing that they recognise the dangers of pornography. After that they would then receive a code to unlock the filter.

Describing his plight in the third person, Sevier describes his situation: “His wife abducted his son and disappeared, which was a subsequent consequence of Apple’s decision to sell its computers not on ‘safe mode. The Plaintiff became depressed and despondent, unable to work as a result of observing porn on his MacBook and the impact it caused.”

The Judge involved in the case has failed to acknowledge Sevier’s complaint, at least in part due to the submitted document’s spelling mistakes, grammatical errors and rambling tone. In the excerpt below it seems Sevier has mistaken the word ‘hormones’ for ‘harmonies’:

“As human beings themselves, Apple employees know that a man is born full of harmonies and attacked to by women engaging in sexual acts with the intent to cause vicarious arousal.”

The rest of the document, which can be read in full here, covers topics ranging from cocaine use to 9/11, as well as taking in the utopian state of life in the 1950s and the effect of gays serving in the military. As Sevier declares: “The human heart is what is at stake.”

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