Stay up to date with notifications from The Independent

Notifications can be managed in browser preferences.

LinkedIn lets bosses keep tabs on what employees are posting online with new feature

'We’d like to offer you the chance to see unique data about the sharing activity of your own employees'

Aatif Sulleyman
Friday 01 December 2017 13:13 GMT
Comments
Equifax said the breached records did not put British consumers at risk
Equifax said the breached records did not put British consumers at risk (Getty)

LinkedIn is telling people’s bosses about what their employees are posting online.

The networking site is analysing its users’ sharing habits and offering to send its findings to their employers.

This includes the amount of content people within the company are posting, and the impact these updates are having on “content engagement”. The data is collected at a company level, allowing bosses to see how often employees at their company post about it when compared with other firms, for instance.

Because data is aggregated and anonymised it isn’t possible for employers to know exactly what any given individual is posting.

The feature was spotted by Matt Navarra, who tweeted a screenshot of an offer message that the company appears to be sending to LinkedIn Elevate users.

The message has the subject line: “Get data on your employees’ sharing behavior”.

“We know from our research that companies whose employees regularly share content are able to better market their products and services,” it reads.

“We’d like to offer you the chance to see unique data about the sharing activity of your own employees, something we’re only doing for a select set of companies.”

This data is said to include:

  • Employees’ sharing rates
  • The percentage of employees that “already share company-relevant” content
  • The impact they’re having on content engagement
  • Guidance for turning more employees into “advocates”

The message adds that LinkedIn will “be in touch with your custom data” once the offer is accepted.

Join our commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in