Samsung Galaxy S10 may feature 5G chip that trumps the quickest iPhone

Samsung says the new chip is capable of transferring 51GB of data per second – or approximately 14 full-HD video files

The Samsung Galaxy S9 and S9 Plus: Everything you need to know

Samsung's upcoming Galaxy S10 smartphone may take the crown as the fastest smartphone on the market, thanks to a new ultra-powerful chip built by the South Korean manufacturer.

Samsung revealed on Tuesday, 17 July, that it had successfully developed an 8Gb chip for its mobile devices, paving the way for 5G connectivity and artificial intelligence-powered applications.

The new chip could feature in the upcoming Samsung Galaxy S10, which is expected to be unveiled next year.

“This development of 8Gb LPDDR5 represents a major step forward for low-power mobile memory solutions,” said Jinman Han, a senior vice president at Samsung Electronics.

“We will continue to expand our next-generation 10nm-class DRAM lineup as we accelerate the move toward greater use of premium memory across the global landscape.”

The successor to the Samsung Galaxy S9 could be significantly faster

Samsung said the new chip is capable of transferring 51GB of data per second – or approximately 14 full-HD video files.

By comparison, the Galaxy S9 has only 4GB of RAM, while the iPhone X features only 3GB of RAM. The only mass-produced smartphone to feature 8GB is the OnePlus 6.

Other rumours for the Galaxy S10 include a fingerprint sensor that uses ultrasonic sensors embedded in the screen to read fingerprints. The device will also reportedly ditch the iris scanner and instead feature facial recognition technology for its camera.

Several rumours claim the S10 will come in two sizes: a standard 5.8-inch version and a 6.3-inch S10 Plus version. It is not yet clear when Samsung plans to release the flagship phone, though either the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas at the start of January, or Mobile World Congress taking place in Europe in February.

Its launch will follow the release of the firm's other premium handset, the Galaxy Note 9, later this year, which renowned Samsung leaker Ice Universe suggesting that it would be too early for the new chip.

A recent Note 9 leak suggested Samsung will be sticking with the same design as the Galaxy Note 8, with an image appearing almost identical to its predecessor.

Leaked specs suggest the Note 9 will feature an upgraded Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 processor, 6GB or RAM and a minimum of 64GB of storage.

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