Twitter gives Elon Musk even more user data after billionaire complains about bots

Mr Musk now has access to real-time data that could be the last hurdle ahead of his buyout

Twitter has given Elon Musk even more user data.

The billionaire had complained that the data Twitter had previously given hum was not sufficient.

Mr Musk now has access to real-time data, including API information, which some suggest will be the last hurdle ahead of his buyout.

Mr Musk had previously claimed the company was attempting to ‘resist and thwart’ his information rights ahead of his $44 billion acquisition of the social media platform.

“Based on Twitter’s behaviour to date, and the company’s latest correspondence in particular, Mr Musk believes the company is actively resisting and thwarting his information rights”, lawyer Mike Ringler wrote in a letter.

“This is a clear material breach of Twitter’s obligations under the merger agreement and Mr Musk reserves all rights resulting therefrom, including his right not to consummate the transaction and his right to terminate the merger agreement.”

This new data includes tweets and activity on the platform that is usually accessed through the developer platform. This would give Mr Musk, who did not do due diligence before making the offer, the ability to analyse bots.

"Twitter has and will continue to cooperatively share information with Mr. Musk to consummate the transaction in accordance with the terms of the merger agreement”, Twitter said in a statement to Insider.

Mr Musk may intend to back out of the deal entirely, which would likely result in a legal battle. Twitter’s board has said that it is committed to the acquisition, encourage it to avoid a legal battle, people familiar with the deal told Insider.

Twitter has been "bending over backwards" to comply with Mr Musk’s demands, another person familiar with the matter said.

The relationship between Twitter’s executives and Mr Musk over bots has been a tumultuous one.

In May this year, Mr Musk  announced that his proposed takeover of the social media platform was “on hold” as he looked for more information about spam, bots and fake accounts on the platform.

When Mr Agrawal detailed how Twitter estimates fake accounts in a lengthy thread, Mr Musk responded with the poop emoji.

The Independent has exclusively reported that Mr Agrawal will be will be visiting the tech giant’s employees in London next week.

The executive, who took control of the company after founder Jack Dorsey left the company in November last year, will address staff in a meeting on 30 June, as part of a three-day visit from the US.

The reasons for Mr Agrawal’s visit remain unclear – even to Twitter’s own employees – but there are concerned rumours that it could signal a reduction in staff.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in