'You're nearly three, you need to toughen up a bit': Four-year-old girl tells-off younger brother for spitting in hit viral video that could earn parents £1000s

In the clip, Delilah O’Donoghue lectures her two-year-old brother Gabriel on why he shouldn’t spit, and why he should listen to their parents.

A minute-long video of a four-year-old girl telling off her younger brother for spitting has gone viral
A minute-long video of a four-year-old girl telling off her younger brother for spitting has gone viral

A minute-long video of a four-year-old girl telling-off her younger brother for spitting has gone viral – and could earn their parents thousands of pounds.

In the clip, Delilah O’Donoghue lectures her two-year-old brother Gabriel on why he shouldn’t spit at other children, and why he should listen to their parents.

Delilah also points out that her brother is too young to fear getting into fights with the older boy he spat at, adding “you need to toughen up a bit”.

The heart-warming exchange has already been viewed over a million times on YouTube, with interview requests coming from as far as America.

Delilah and Gabriel’s father Lee O’Donoghue has spoken of how he had only posted the video on YouTube as he thought it would amuse his friends and family, describing its global popularity as “surreal”.

The 42-year-old said he began filming on his smartphone about two minutes into Gabriel’s telling off.

‘I watched from afar until I realised he must be really getting it from her…In classic Delilah style she decides to give it to him straight,’ he said.

Alex O’Donoghue, the children’s 40-year-old mother, added: ‘Delilah’s very bossy – it is how little girls are…She has scolded Gabriel in the past. But it is as much about trying to teach him. They are good little buddies really.’

As Delilah’s dressing-down continues, two-year-old Gabriel hangs his head and fidgets in his seat.

Delilah tells him: “I’ll keep remembering you being about two and I’ll tell my friends that too...You’re nearly three, you should toughen up a bit.”

“When Mum and Dad said you don’t do that, you don’t do that... and you don’t spit.”

Referring to the boy Gabriel apparently spat at, Delilah says: “That boy’s old enough. You’re only two…You’re not old enough for that boy to do a fight…That boy’s older than you. Maybe he’s nine or ten, or maybe eight.”

Delilah finishes her telling-off with the words “Think about it Gabriel. Think about it.”

Following the video’s success, the children’s parents have signed-up with video marketing company Viral Spiral, which aims to maximise the profits of home-movie makers who post their clips online.

The couple said they had not yet decided how to proceed with marketing the video, saying their first concern is the impact any deal would have on their children.

The most-viewed viral video of all time, ‘Charlie Bit My Finger’, also features a pair of British siblings and was also marketed by Viral Spiral.

That clip has been viewed more than 480 million times since it was first posted in 2007 and has earned the boys’ parents upwards of £100,000.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in