This is how lakes in the US are stocked with fish from the air

Experts say that this practice is less stressful for the fish compared with other methods

Gianluca Avagnina
Saturday 01 September 2018 21:25
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Utah's high-mountain lakes are stoked with fish from the air

Fish are being dropped from an aircraft into high-mountain lakes in the US state of Utah in a bid to restock them.

The state's Division of Wildlife Resources, which released footage of a drop, said that the practice was less stressful for the fish and that 95 per cent survive the fall.

The fish, in this case tiny trout, are between 1-3 inches (2.5 to 7.6 centimetres) long and are dropped to populate lakes lacking natural reproduction.

This aerial method is used to stock over 200 of the region’s mountain lakes, which are typically difficult to reach by land.

Aerial fish dropping is a common practice for a number of states with high mountain lakes in their territory.

Normally fish stocking is done with the help of trucks that transport fish to a river or a lake, and then dump it into the water through a pipe system.

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