The limited lessons of Australia’s ‘safe’ change to a slightly greener, more caring alternative

Editorial: The voters restored Labor to government in Canberra after nine years

Saturday 21 May 2022 21:30
Comments
<p>Anthony Albanese’s Labor Party secured a smaller share of first-preference votes than it did three years ago</p>

Anthony Albanese’s Labor Party secured a smaller share of first-preference votes than it did three years ago

There will be many articles over the next few days – some of them even in The Independent – in which the writer will conclude that the Australian election result confirms everything they already believed about politics.

In Britain, Labour supporters will claim it shows that an uncharismatic leader can prevail over anti-immigrant and “culture war” rhetoric by staying true to a traditional message of social justice. Conservatives will claim that Scott Morrison paid the price of departing from the values of his traditional supporters – the free market, low taxes and frugal public spending.

Greens will claim that their time is coming – their Australian equivalents gained ground as the third party in share of first-preference votes. Both the Greens and the Liberal Democrats might also point to the night’s biggest winners, the “teal” independent candidates, who gained most seats from the ruling Liberal coalition. These are a distinctively Australian group of anti-establishment politicians – not even a party. Most are strongly motivated by the climate emergency, with an attitude of “a plague on both your houses” towards the two main parties.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in