What can be done about the Queen’s turbulent second son, the Duke of York?

Editorial: Such is human nature that not everyone who happens to be born into the House of Windsor is as cautious and dutiful as, say, Her Majesty – genetics has its limits

Tuesday 04 January 2022 21:30
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<p>The royal family, and the public generally, will manage very well without Prince Andrew</p>

The royal family, and the public generally, will manage very well without Prince Andrew

Such is the nature of the hereditary principle that, sometimes, less than ideal personalities pop up in the line of royal succession or elsewhere as prominent members of the family; people whose sense of judgement can be problematic, to put it mildly, and cause trouble.

Such is human nature, indeed, that not everyone who happens to be born into the House of Windsor is as cautious and dutiful as, say, the Queen – genetics has its limits. What, then, can be done with and about her turbulent second son, the Duke of York?

However his legal problems eventually resolve themselves, his reputation, as his lawyers are keen to point out, has been tarnished by his associations with convicted paedophile Jeffrey Epstein, convicted sex trafficker, Ghislaine Maxwell, and the allegations levelled against him by Virginia Giuffre, vehemently denied by Prince Andrew.

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