Now we know: The #FreeBritney movement was right all along

‘I am traumatised’, Spears said in her testimony. ‘I’ve lied and told the whole world I’m okay and I’m happy’

Chris Stevenson
Thursday 24 June 2021 08:32
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<p>Fans and supporters of Britney Spears outside the County Courthouse in Los Angeles</p>

Fans and supporters of Britney Spears outside the County Courthouse in Los Angeles

"This conservatorship is doing me way more harm than good... I deserve to have a life".

Those are the words of Britney Spears, who has had her say in open court in Los Angeles against her conservatorship. Calling the situation "abusive", Spears said that she wanted to "share my story to the world".

"They’ve done a good job at exploiting my life,” Spears said – talking about those in charge of the conservatorship – “so I feel like it should be an open court hearing and they should listen and hear what I have to say.”

There has been one group that has stood by the singer for years, the #FreeBritney movement – made up of Britney's fans. They often demonstrate outside court hearings and dozens of people were there again on Wednesday, holding signs reading "Free Britney now!"

Speculation about how Spears feels about the conservatorship has existed for years, with supporters going through her social media output for any possible clues.

One thing is now clear – that movement was right. Megan Radford, one of the founders of the movement, told the BBC that she was "so thankful that her truth is out there and it cannot be denied anymore."

"I am traumatised," Spears said in her testimony – done remotely. “I’ve lied and told the whole world I’m okay and I’m happy.”

Conservatorship is a type of court-appointed guardianship intended for people who can no longer make decisions for themselves. In the case of Spears, it has given her father, Jamie Spears, control of her finances and some personal matters for much of the time since it was granted by a court in 2008.

Speaking of her father, Spears said: ”The control he had over someone as powerful as me, as he loved the control to hurt his own daughter 100,000%.”

After the testimony, a statement delivered by lawyers for Jamie Spears said: “He is sorry to see his daughter suffering and in so much pain... Mr Spears loves his daughter, and misses her very much.”

As to the extent of the conservatorship, Britney said that she wanted to marry her boyfriend and have a baby, but that the conservatorship stopped her from doing so. She also alleged that she has been stopped from having a contraceptive intrauterine device (IUD) removed so she could get pregnant.

The judge in the case thanked the singer for her "courageous" words, but no judgement was issued. It is believed that a long legal process will likely be required before any decision is made about ending the conservatorship.

But there can no longer be any doubt, or speculation, about how Britney feels over the conservatorship. Her words have been clear – as she meant them to be.

They may be vindication for the #FreeBritney movement – with Sam Asghari, Spears’s boyfriend, also posting a picture on Instagram of himself in Free Britney T-Shirt – but supporters will likely just be glad that the singer has been able to have her say.

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